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May
5
comment Feynman's Infinite Amount of Logic for One Tiny Bit of Space
@jinawee I have no idea what he might have been talking about. Continuity of space-time, maybe? But that can't be it, we already knew about Plank distance and time back then.
Jun
27
comment When does centripetal force cause constant circular motion?
Oh, I see. Simple enough.
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
That is a good argument, and one that I was hoping I would get. But how does the generalized form of that equation look like? Or, at least, how does it look if you introduce another dimension?
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
@VineetMenon I rewrote the question.
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
@VineetMenon Could you please post an answer explaining why time is fundamentally different from other dimensions? My current understanding (as a non-physicist) is that "spatial" and "temporal" dimensions are the same things, but they have different names because we experience them differently. I guess you could say that the distinction is that movement is restricted in the fourth dimension, but do we know that to be a characteristic of the dimension, or is it a limitation of our technology?
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
I did not know there was a Theoretical Physics board here on SE. If you think this question is better suited there, please move it. theoreticalphysics.stackexchange.com
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
+1 "Flatland" seems very interesting. Thanks for pointing it out.
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
"With respect to the brain scan: this way of visualisation is chosen for simplicity" -- I know, but that is besides the point for this question. :) I picked that image because it illustartes how 2D scans in rapid succession look like a substance that evolves over time.
Feb
4
comment Is time fundamentally different from space?
"you can in principle move freely forward and backward, while in time, your motion is fixed" -- But is that a characteristic of the dimension, or a limitation of our technology and/ or dimensional nature? Afaik, there's no evidence that time travel in the past is impossible, so there's nothing that can be said for certain about that for now.
Nov
28
comment What are some scenarios where FTL information transfer would violate causality?
@JustinL. A way you could think about this is perceiving a 2D plane (a paper) from different angles in 3D; if 'all is right', your perception will distort, but you'll never see an impossible shape. The same way with perceiving a 3D body in 4D; depending on how you move in 4D, your perception of the 3D body might change, but you shouldn't ever see something that is impossible.