126 reputation
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location Boston, MA
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen May 5 '13 at 2:40

May
1
comment How fair is it to say that all chemistry arises from failures of the ideal gas law?
Right, I don't mean to give a human model priority; just trying to "organize our ignorance" & understand how that model relates to some of our other modeling. If the statement is "only" backwards, then I'd say it's in good shape, since we can turn it around easily enough. Is "arises" problematic? How about: "Chemistry happens where the ideal gas law fails." (Also, I only mean logical implication, not physical causation.)
Apr
30
asked How fair is it to say that all chemistry arises from failures of the ideal gas law?
Jul
25
comment Can a free hydrogen atom constitute ionizing radiation?
Ugh, these are both fantastic answers! Upvoted both, but I'm accepting this one for catching me on the "neutral object" distinction. Thanks too, @dmckee.
Jul
25
awarded  Scholar
Jul
25
awarded  Supporter
Jul
25
accepted Can a free hydrogen atom constitute ionizing radiation?
Jul
24
asked Can a free hydrogen atom constitute ionizing radiation?
Jun
25
comment What, if anything, makes forces the “cause” and acceleration the “effect”?
Fair enough! Reposted (reworded) on Philosophy StackExchange: philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/622/… Thanks guys. @student, I'll check that out.
Jun
23
awarded  Student
Jun
23
asked What, if anything, makes forces the “cause” and acceleration the “effect”?