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Dec
25
revised Parameter determining argon phase
edited tags
Dec
25
answered Parameter determining argon phase
Dec
25
comment Parameter determining argon phase
What's your N? By the way "some states which should be in vapor form" --- why do you think they should be in a vapor form?
Dec
21
comment How does a vacuum oven work?
doesn't reducing :heat loss which is caused by convection" contradict "quick cooling of the product as there are no air to hold heat around product"?
Dec
21
comment Intuitive explanation of the inverse square power $\frac{1}{r^2}$ in Newton's law of gravity
What do you think is more flawed --- transition from points to surfaces or from the force between two bodies to a field?
Dec
21
accepted What is the physical meaning of a flux of gravitational field in classics?
Dec
21
comment What is the physical meaning of a flux of gravitational field in classics?
so no physical meaning?
Dec
21
asked What is the physical meaning of a flux of gravitational field in classics?
Dec
20
comment Intuitive explanation of the inverse square power $\frac{1}{r^2}$ in Newton's law of gravity
I want to do something with it, could you please join the chat? chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/6805/…
Dec
20
comment Intuitive explanation of the inverse square power $\frac{1}{r^2}$ in Newton's law of gravity
Why is proceeding from point-like bodies to surfaces is "too speculative"? At least in the framework of classical physics. Though, frankly speaking, I see no explanation for the square power in classics, being it geometrical or not. Nevertheless if there some general principal prohibiting transition from points to surfaces, I'd like to know it.
Dec
19
comment Interesting Math Topics Useful for Physics
"interesting, but less popular" The specific math topic is either required or not. As for your question, for a start you should know algebra and differential geometry, that's the basic requirement for every field in physics.
Dec
13
comment Why do power lines buzz more when it is low-humidity outside?
have a look at physics.stackexchange.com/a/45488/4020
Dec
5
comment Why quantum mechanics?
As for me it's physics, you do not motivate studying the theory, you motivate studying certain kinds of phenomena/objects/processes. You just say that this and this cannot be treated in classics. Personally, I was never interested in the scope of quantum mechanics, I just don't care what happens in the microworld, knowing the difficulties in describing macroscopic phenomena, say like turbulence. The only thing QM served for me is advancing my math.
Dec
5
awarded  Constituent
Dec
5
comment Why are Navier-Stokes equations needed?
"Theoretically, we can show that in the hydrodynamic ..." I believe this paragraph is wrong at the current time. I thought you can derive NS from the Boltzmann equation, so techinically you can derive NS to a certain extent only for gases, but not for liquids. Or do you know statistical NS derivation for liquids?
Nov
27
answered Speed of Entropy change
Nov
27
awarded  Caucus
Nov
27
comment Is it possible to have a Gas heavier than a liquid?
@MartinBeckett I thought of this, but such materials would be better qualified as foams, not as liquids. I was looking for the lightest paraffin, but they are still quite heavy.
Nov
26
comment Is it possible to have a Gas heavier than a liquid?
Maybe there is some really light "solid" material which is a supercooled liquid, like glass but much more lighter. Of course you won't get a thermodynamically equllibrium state, but mechanical equllibrium might be possible.
Nov
9
accepted Is it wrong to talk about wave functions of macroscopic bodies?