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Mar
18
comment Is the flow of time regular?
People are asking how you define "flow of time". Let me know if you agree with the following reformulation of your question: "Is it possible to observe a location in space-time, wait a couple minutes in your reference frame, then observe the same space-time location?" In other words, you look at the same spatial location a little later, and note that the time coordinate has not changed. I don't think this is possible.
Feb
20
comment Can Flow of time become still?
@Cruncher - But it is only a non-inertial frame while it is accelerating. Once it reaches its "cruising speed", it is now in an inertial frame. At that point, do all observers agree that the spaceship clock is currently ticking slower than the Earth clock? From what JohnRennie just said, it seems like the answer is no.
Feb
20
comment Can Flow of time become still?
Thanks for the clarification. I've never been 100% clear on the twin paradox. The way it was explained to me is that it is not a paradox, because all observers will agree that the spaceship clock is moving slower, since it is the reference frame that accelerated from the Earth reference frame. But I never could accept that explanation, because it seems to imply an absolute rest frame.
Feb
20
comment Can Flow of time become still?
"...it is just running slowly relative to a clock on Earth as observed by the observer on Earth." Does that mean observers from other reference frames might disagree about whether the Earth clock is running slower than the spaceship clock or vice versa?
May
23
comment Why does sound move faster in solids?
Here's a way to think of it. If I shove my open palm towards you, will you feel it more quickly if: a) there is water between us, and a wave ripples towards you and eventually splashes you, or b) if there is a solid rod between us, and it smacks into you?
Jun
14
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