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Physics grad student.


Jul
4
comment How can I take the Wigner transform of an operator with an absolute value?
@Qmechanic: Sorry! It was a typo.
Jul
4
revised How can I take the Wigner transform of an operator with an absolute value?
corrected bad math
Jul
3
asked How can I take the Wigner transform of an operator with an absolute value?
Jul
3
reviewed No Action Needed Would being underwater help survive a nuclear bomb?
Jul
3
awarded  Proofreader
Jul
3
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Concept of separation of charges in lightning clouds
Jul
3
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to explain in simple terms why Entanglement is more than just complicated hidden variables
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
11
reviewed Leave Open Could a real-life X-Wing fly in Earth's atmosphere?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Two springs and a mass between length L
Jun
11
reviewed Close Projectiles and escape velocity
Jun
9
awarded  Yearling
Jun
7
accepted Examples of Weyl transforms of nontrivial operators
May
21
comment Deriving probability distributions from the Wigner distribution
@bechira: That summary doesn't include getting the full probability distributions for the Weyl transform of an operator, just expectation values.
May
20
revised Examples of Weyl transforms of nontrivial operators
added QM and phase space tags
May
20
asked Examples of Weyl transforms of nontrivial operators
May
13
asked Deriving probability distributions from the Wigner distribution
May
6
comment Why does a force field leave the momentum operator unchanged in the Schrödinger equation?
@Sebastian Henckel: $|\vec{k}|=\sqrt{\frac{2m\omega}{\hbar}}$ isn't necessary for the derivation of the momentum or energy operators.
May
1
comment Why does a force field leave the momentum operator unchanged in the Schrödinger equation?
All wave vectors do have to be used. When I said "plane wave", all I meant was $e^{ikx}$ functions in space. Also, the formulas for momentum and energy can be derived directly from the fact that they are associated with wavenumber and frequency repectively, and that the wavefunction can be fourier transformed in both space and time. See this part of the Fourier transform wikipedia article for more details.
Apr
29
comment Why does a force field leave the momentum operator unchanged in the Schrödinger equation?
@Sebastian Henckel: Also, recall that the expansion in terms of plane waves is just the Fourier transform. Are you implying that the ground state of hydrogen can't be fourier transformed?