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Started programming on a ZX spectrum in the 80's and have moved through Assembly, Turbo Pascal, C++, C#, Fortran. My main area of focus is engineering and scientific computing like numerical methods and 3D graphics.


Mar
31
comment Cancelling internal forces/moments term when deriving inertial matrix
Related question: physics.stackexchange.com/q/113906/392
Mar
31
comment Cancelling internal forces/moments term when deriving inertial matrix
${\bf M}_G = I \dot{{\bf \omega}}$ is not the correct formula. See physics.stackexchange.com/a/65731/392. I suggest using the momentum of each ${\rm d}m$ to get to the mass moment of inertia of a rigid body.
Mar
30
comment Moment Of Inertia About Centre of Mass
Actually I find this answer confuses the matter a bit. MMOI is more clearly defined from the proportionality of speed and momentum and not from acceleration and force.
Mar
30
revised Torque on a disc?
added 81 characters in body
Mar
30
comment Torque on a disc?
The only way to get any motion would be to put the two motors on the same axis. It is like you are taking two gears on two shafts and gluing them together. Nothing will move.
Mar
30
comment Torque on a disc?
A motor connection is a joint. It has the ability to supply torque in Z direction, as well as forces in X and Y.
Mar
30
comment How to derive (the dimensionless coefficient in front of) the moment of inertia for common shapes?
I second the above comment. The key concept here is the radius of gyration which simplifies complex shapes down to a rotating ring of concentrated mass.
Mar
30
answered Torque on a disc?
Mar
30
comment Torque on a disc?
Is there a physical joint in these points, whereas beyond a torque reaction forces exist?
Mar
25
comment Kinematics of a differential drive robot
So then if the inside wheel has zero velocity there must be slipping if the robot is moving on an arc where the center of rotation is away from the inside wheel.
Mar
25
answered Kinematics of a differential drive robot
Mar
25
comment Kinematics of a differential drive robot
PS. Use math formatting for better readability. Enclose formulas in $...$ (see physics.stackexchange.com/help/notation)
Mar
25
comment Kinematics of a differential drive robot
Do you have a sketch of the robot? Does it only have two wheels like a segway, or 3, or 4 wheels of which only two are diven.
Mar
25
comment Angular velocity and instantaneous rotation axis
Check your math. It should be $$\omega = \frac{v}{R}$$
Mar
24
comment Derive Equation For a Cantilever in SHM
From the sketch I see now this is cantilever beam, and hence the above solution stands for $n=\frac{1}{2}$ or $$ T^2 = \frac{768 M x^3}{\pi^2 b E d^3} $$
Mar
23
comment Starting point for a derivation of fictitious forces
See envsci.rutgers.edu/~broccoli/dynamics_lectures/… first
Mar
23
comment Derive Equation For a Cantilever in SHM
Can you please show some kind of sketch.
Mar
20
comment Maximum acceleration for a vehicle
Peak acceleration is most likely to happen at zero velocity, at launch.
Mar
20
comment Maximum acceleration for a vehicle
See related post physics.stackexchange.com/a/15620/392 to find distance traveled when acceleration is defined as a function of distance (spring deflection).
Mar
20
comment Maximum acceleration for a vehicle
@user1892467 the op question asks about max. accelerations. The comments is no place to answer a secondary question. Please award this question and ask a new one on how to use max traction to design the transmission mechanism for optimal distance. This is not that simple as more information is needed than supplied in this posting.