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Started programming on a ZX spectrum in the 80's and have moved through Assembly, Turbo Pascal, C++, C#, Fortran. My main area of focus is engineering and scientific computing like numerical methods and 3D graphics.


Jun
1
comment How to calculate torque neccessary to move bar?
Yes the motor would have to be able to move back and forth in order to keep the tension in the pulley.
May
31
comment How to calculate torque neccessary to move bar?
Is there something resisting the motion, like friction?
May
30
revised Power and velocity?
added 227 characters in body
May
30
awarded  Revival
May
29
comment General motion of a cone on an inclined surface
The simplest solution is when friction is zero, the cone will slide in a straight line. The 2nd most complex case is pure rolling (infinite friction) and the most complex is slip/roll combination. What where you looking for?
May
29
comment General motion of a cone on an inclined surface
Using math formatting by enclosing expressions with $...$ makes any post far more readable. See physics.stackexchange.com/help/notation
May
29
answered Connection between moment/torque and centre of gravity?
May
27
comment If I shoot a hockey puck on ice, is the force of me shooting it applied throughout its travel, or is it a one time force?
Or Zeno who did not believe in motion at all.
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
@Anthony, yes. The details of the cross terms (torque due to linear acceleration, and force due to angular acceleration) are again in link 1.
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
In the 1st link you see the equation $\sum \vec{M}_A = I_C \vec{\alpha} + m \vec{c} \times \vec{a}_A + \ldots$? The $m \vec{c} \times \vec{a}_A$ term is what I am talking about.
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
Then you need to add the torque due to the inertial loads of the body. A $d m g$ term where $d$ is the center of mass distance to the center of the bar.
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
possible duplicate of What is the proof that a force applied on a rigid body will cause it to rotate around its center of mass?
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
See the 2nd link in my edited post.
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
Because it is the net torque about the center of mass that counts, not the geometric center.
May
27
revised Torque in a non-inertial frame
added 430 characters in body
May
27
comment Torque in a non-inertial frame
I cannot conclude anything unless I know the details.
May
27
answered Torque in a non-inertial frame
May
26
comment Angular acceleration as a function of torque
For being self taught you have come a long way. I've been hesitant to vote for close this question as duplicate because a) your efforts should be rewarded and b) the duplicate question does not have an accepted answer. Best course would be for you to answer your own question with your own equations (and referencing my answer too maybe) and award it to yourself.
May
26
comment Angular acceleration as a function of torque
As a note, pure angular motion does not have a location. So the statement "the angular acceleration with respect to the centre of mass" is a little confusing. All parts of a rigid body move with the same angular motion. Only linear motion needs to have a location specified in order to be fully qualified.
May
26
comment Angular acceleration as a function of torque
See physics.stackexchange.com/a/113896/392 which is where I think you are going with this.