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Aug
4
comment Do all the conservation laws of Physics take no time to propagate?
In my EPR pair example, there is a more energetic particle and a less energetic particle, but it is not determined which is which. If you measure the energy of one, you can immediately infer the energy of the other. But this does not require or imply that either information or energy is moving faster than light. Why would it? See physics.stackexchange.com/a/3163/3811 for more details, for example.
Aug
3
comment Do all the conservation laws of Physics take no time to propagate?
Yes, you can have two distant entangled particles (called an EPR pair), where one is more energetic and one is less energetic, but it is not determined which is which until you measure them. You can look online or in an intro QM textbook for an explanation of why information does not flow faster than light when you measure an EPR pair. This information-flow issue is commonly discussed. Well, energy also does not flow faster than light when you measure an EPR pair ... and it's for the exact same reason.
Aug
3
comment Do all the conservation laws of Physics take no time to propagate?
There is no such thing as just "continuity", there are a wide variety of "continuity equations" describing many different quantities. Energy and momentum are conserved in quantum mechanics, and yes, those conservation laws are written as continuity equations in quantum mechanics too. There is no conflict between entanglement (which is ubiquitous in QM) and these continuity equations. I'm not sure why you think there would be. Can you explain what you have in mind?
Aug
3
answered Do all the conservation laws of Physics take no time to propagate?
Aug
2
comment Is this diagram, concerning Young's double slits, inaccurate?
I added another couple paragraphs...
Aug
2
revised Is this diagram, concerning Young's double slits, inaccurate?
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Aug
2
answered Is this diagram, concerning Young's double slits, inaccurate?
Jul
31
answered Wavelength vs Wavenumber etiquette
Jul
29
revised Is Ronald Ace's “solar trap” patent plausible?
fix other link
Jul
29
revised Is Ronald Ace's “solar trap” patent plausible?
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Jul
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revised Is Ronald Ace's “solar trap” patent plausible?
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Jul
27
awarded  Self-Learner
Jul
27
asked Is Ronald Ace's “solar trap” patent plausible?
Jul
27
answered Is Ronald Ace's “solar trap” patent plausible?
Jul
25
comment Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?
Any textbook about quantum field theory should have a proof that Maxwell's equations + Lorentz Force Law are the classical limit of QED. (Although sometimes it's left as a homework exercise.)
Jul
25
answered Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?
Jul
25
revised Why does normal incidence eliminate the photocarrier effect radiation in this experiment?
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Jul
25
revised Why does normal incidence eliminate the photocarrier effect radiation in this experiment?
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Jul
25
answered Why does normal incidence eliminate the photocarrier effect radiation in this experiment?
Jul
19
accepted Why are band maxima / minima often (always?) at high-symmetry points?