3,982 reputation
11430
bio website
location Belgium
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 1 hour ago

"I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong."

-- Bertrand Russell


Dec
4
revised How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
added 68 characters in body
Dec
4
revised How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
added 588 characters in body; added 196 characters in body
Dec
3
comment Which experiments prove atomic theory?
Right, Mach was indeed the most well-known opponent. I upvoted your answer.
Dec
3
revised How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
added 1513 characters in body
Dec
3
revised How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
added 1665 characters in body
Dec
3
comment How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
Woops, sorry, forgot about it.
Dec
3
comment Magnetism-Related Terminology
Sorry, couldn't resist.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to throw an object faster but over the same distance?
Or in baseball. Even in soccer.
Dec
3
comment Which experiments prove atomic theory?
On the contrary, Boltzmann was an advocate of the atomic hypothesis. He actually implemented it in his mathematical research of the mechanical foundation of thermodynamics. He even introduced quantization of energy before Planck as a tool of computation.
Dec
3
comment Deriving the speed of the propagation of a change in the Electromagnetic Field from Maxwell's Equations
Basically, the form of the equation. As Marek puts it in his answer, it's the d'Alembert wave operator. It's a thoroughly studied operator and the spectrum is well-known. In other words, the behaviour of the solutions is known to be waves moving at velocity the square root of the coefficient in front of the Laplacian (if the coefficient in front of the double time derivative is 1).
Dec
2
comment Which experiments prove atomic theory?
Actually, there is an experiment by Perrin related to this which has been pivotal in the acceptance of the atomic hypothesis. I think Perrin got the Nobel Prize for it by the way.
Dec
2
comment Ising model for dummies
Maybe something for Marek, since he's trying to understand the 'Onsager solution' better.
Dec
2
comment CPT and heat equation
@dmckee: Of course, I didn't mean to give an exhaustive explanation. In fact, I left my explanation open to many attacks on purpose. I hope that Boy will think further and come to these questions by himself. But a thorough answer would indeed need a thorough course in statistical mechanics.
Dec
2
answered Nonlinear optics as gauge theory
Dec
2
comment CPT and heat equation
Actually, the Schrödinger equation is invariant. But you have to take the complex conjugate of $\psi$. Since $\psi^*$ and $\psi$ have the same probability distributions $|\psi|^2$, the physics remains the same.
Dec
2
answered CPT and heat equation
Dec
1
comment How many Onsager's solutions are there?
Yeah, I kinda got that was what you were looking after, the technique to arrive at the solution rather than just the solution itself. Maybe you should put a bounty on the question to attract people. :p
Dec
1
comment How many Onsager's solutions are there?
Seems to me the differences are just in the techniques. The solution of the system should remain the same, and that's why they call it Onsager's solution, while there are many different ways to arrive at it. Quite typical of physics problems no? Wether you solve the Kepler problem with Newtonian mechanics or Hamiltonian mechanics, the solution is the same. However, a new insight can be coupled to the different technique. Or one of the techniques can be more easily generalizable. If nobody comes along with a ready answer, I'm willing to look a bit more deeply into this.
Dec
1
revised Ising model for dummies
added 28 characters in body; deleted 62 characters in body
Dec
1
revised Ising model for dummies
added 297 characters in body