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location Cologne, Germany
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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 19 hours ago

Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Apr
19
revised Why doesn't light, which travels faster than sound, produce a sonic boom?
added 925 characters in body
Apr
16
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
16
revised Why doesn't light, which travels faster than sound, produce a sonic boom?
added 282 characters in body
Apr
16
answered Why doesn't light, which travels faster than sound, produce a sonic boom?
Apr
10
comment Why is static electricity called static?
@brhans: not everyone may agree here, but I'd say a capacitor is in the realm of static electricity. A battery is not, because it depends on electrochemical processes. Freeze a battery in liquid nitrogen, and the voltage will soon drop because the reactions largely cease – without them, the battery still keeps some static charge, but that's neglectable compared to the battery's operational charge.
Apr
5
answered Does a capacitor ever get fully charged?
Apr
2
comment Why doesn't light affect a compass?
@RenéG: I didn't mean “for lower-frequency EM radiation, the needle would still not move” (that would not be light anymore), I meant “if light happened to have a lower frequency, while all other properties were the same as in reality, i.e. the wavelength would still be to small to affect the needle as a whole” – hypothetically. Of course this would entail meddling with the values of the speed of light and the Planck constant...
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
revised Why doesn't light affect a compass?
deleted 5 characters in body
Mar
30
answered Why doesn't light affect a compass?
Mar
25
comment How does anything move?
Good point. However you don't really need such functions to resolve the paradox, since, in reality, it's not possible to start from exactly zero for all negative $t$ anyway.
Mar
23
comment Most True to Life Physics & Biology Simulation Engine?
“a key ingredient in physics is knowing what approximations to make” – indeed you could go as far as saying this is what physics is all about: no physical theory is “true reality”, they're all just models of reality which happen to agree with certain experiments (but might always fail for some future experiment).
Mar
1
comment Why is space (almost) flat? Is it because masses are approximately homogeneously distributed?
Exactly. I.e., the question is not “why is space flat?” (it isn't) but “why does everything we do occur on a scale so small that space appears flat to us?” – to which the answer, I suppose, can't be given as anything more satisfying than the anthropic principle.
Mar
1
revised Why magnetic monopole found in spin ice don't modify the Maxwell's Equations?
Markdown and MathJax
Feb
22
comment Why doesn't my mobile phone pick up the electro-magnetic wave emitted by my water heater?
Apart from the low efficiency of such a small antenna at those wavelengths, the phone also of course filters the signal. It has to be able to get rid of other microwaves pretty close to its own signal bandwidth; then it certainly won't have a problem with some low-frequency mains hum (unless it were so strong to drive the circuitry into nonlinear behaviour or something, but for that you would indeed need a huge antenna).
Feb
7
comment Why doesn't NASA use RAMJET rockets to get into space?
@tpg2114: you don't go to space (least not today).
Feb
7
comment Why doesn't NASA use RAMJET rockets to get into space?
“Traditional rockets...work anywhere.” — Well – sort of, but not really efficiently, unless they have a variable-geometry nozzle. If you use a first-stage launch rocket in vacuum, the exhaust will be strongly underexpanded.
Feb
5
answered Why do most formulas in physics have integer and rational exponents?
Jan
16
comment What would happen if you dropped iPhone from Outer Space?
I highly recommend you read what-if.xkcd.com/58 for general clarification of "what space is". Astronauts so far have always been in orbit around either earth directly, or the moon (which of course itself orbits the earth). If you go "deeper into space", you start orbiting the sun independently, and even is in orbit around the center of the milky way. There is actually no such thing as "zero-g", being in space simply means you're free falling/orbiting.