2,406 reputation
11332
bio website berkeley.academia.edu/…
location Berkeley, CA
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Dec 6 at 23:29

Currently a graduate student in mathematics at the University of California - Berkeley.

Previously obtained a MASt. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Cambridge (2013), and a B.S. in Mathematics and a B.A. in Physics from the University of Chicago (2012).


May
14
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Fixed sign error
May
14
awarded  Self-Learner
May
14
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
added 1 characters in body
May
14
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
added 1 characters in body
May
14
accepted How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
May
14
answered How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
May
13
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Added caveat regarding the image of the Legendre transformation
May
13
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Elaborated on "hunch"
May
12
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Clarified time-dependence of $k(t)$
May
12
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
deleted 1 characters in body
May
12
asked How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
May
9
awarded  Nice Question
May
3
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
answered Difference between slanted indices on a tensor
Mar
29
revised The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
Fixed a couple of typos
Mar
29
suggested approved edit on The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
Mar
29
revised How does Newtonian gravitation conflict with special relativity?
Added clarification for self
Mar
29
comment Confusion between Electric field and Magnetic field of a charged particle.
@A4KASH Just think of a particle moving throughout space. In my reference frame, the particle might be at rest, but in your reference frame, you might observe the particle to be moving with velocity $\mathbf{v}$, because you are moving with respect to me with velocity $-\mathbf{v}$. Thus, even though we measure different numbers, we are still observing the same physical phenomenon. A similar thing happens with the electromagnetic field: you might measure different numbers than I do, but only because our perspectives are different: we are still observing the same physical phenomenon.
Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Question