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bio website berkeley.academia.edu/…
location Berkeley, CA
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 22 hours ago

Currently a graduate student in mathematics at the University of California - Berkeley.

Previously obtained a MASt. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Cambridge (2013), and a B.S. in Mathematics and a B.A. in Physics from the University of Chicago (2012).


May
14
answered How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
May
13
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Added caveat regarding the image of the Legendre transformation
May
13
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Elaborated on "hunch"
May
12
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
Clarified time-dependence of $k(t)$
May
12
revised How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
deleted 1 characters in body
May
12
asked How do I find constraints on the Nambu-Goto Action?
May
9
awarded  Nice Question
May
3
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
answered Difference between slanted indices on a tensor
Mar
29
revised The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
Fixed a couple of typos
Mar
29
suggested suggested edit on The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
Mar
29
revised How does Newtonian gravitation conflict with special relativity?
Added clarification for self
Mar
29
comment Confusion between Electric field and Magnetic field of a charged particle.
@A4KASH Just think of a particle moving throughout space. In my reference frame, the particle might be at rest, but in your reference frame, you might observe the particle to be moving with velocity $\mathbf{v}$, because you are moving with respect to me with velocity $-\mathbf{v}$. Thus, even though we measure different numbers, we are still observing the same physical phenomenon. A similar thing happens with the electromagnetic field: you might measure different numbers than I do, but only because our perspectives are different: we are still observing the same physical phenomenon.
Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
15
revised The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
added 421 characters in body
Mar
15
comment The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
For what it's worth, I mixed up sign conventions in my previous comment. It should be that $p^2=-m^2$, with the convention used in the Lagrangian.
Mar
15
comment The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
If it helps to clarify, this is how I think about it. There are two notions of mass involved: the mathematical one that is part of our model, and the physical one which we are trying to model. The physical mass needs to be defined by an idealized experiment, and then, if our model is to be any good, we should be able to come up with a 'proof' that our mathematical definition agrees with the physical one. Does that make sense?
Mar
15
comment The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
Ironically, the word "precise" here is not meant to be precise; it is open to interpretation. The word that really matters here is "operational": to define mass via some sort of (thought) experiment. In section 2.2 of academia.edu/829613/… , I give a classical definition in the spirit of which I am looking, except now, I want to do this in a relativistic setting. I never thought of this until just now, but maybe the idea behind the classical definition could just be modified?
Mar
15
comment The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories
We can define mass this way, and I already know how to relate this definition to the term appearing in the Lagrangian. The question is, how do we relate this mathematical definition of mass to a precise, physical, operational definition of mass. Does that make sense?