561 reputation
34
bio website
location Russia
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen May 5 '12 at 20:03

Scientist


May
30
comment If there is a meltdown at the Fukushima reactors, would the control rods melt also?
world-nuclear.org/info/fukushima_accident_inf129.html
May
28
comment What can the D-Wave quantum computer do?
There is not very boring stuff in list I mentioned, e.g.: Does adiabatic quantum optimization fail for NP-complete problems? N. G. Dickson et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, Issue 5, 050502 arxiv.org/abs/1010.0669
May
27
comment What can the D-Wave quantum computer do?
They did not promise to do Shor algorithm dwavesys.com/en/publications.html
May
26
comment Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?
@Marek: You wrote "OP was referring to the discontinuous nature of the collapse" and so I supposed you are going to explain the discontinuous nature using some discontinuous decoherence. As for "never", I am not sure, e.g. if in theories like GRW decoherence continuous?
May
26
comment Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?
@Marek: There are many definitions of decoherence, but in most of them it is fast, but not discontinuous process. That particular kind of decoherence you are talking about?
May
24
comment Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?
Yet another point is that decoherence is used to describe diagonalization of density matrix, but collapse is other story – it is “problem of definite outcome”. The last problem is not relevant with most practical applications. An analogue of the problem in classical case is a question – I know that probability of each face of dice is 1/6, but I want now to have a method to find precisely that particular face appears in given experiment.
May
23
comment Quantum Physics and the Law of Large Numbers
Even in classical case law of large numbers should not be formulated in such an abstract way as in the question to avoid paradoxes en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Petersburg_Paradox
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty: I wrote "mechanisms like flecks" (i.e. similar with flecks, sorry my poor English). It is written there "(iii) no positive experimental evidence exists for physical state-vector collapse;"
May
23
awarded  Commentator
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty: I think it is an answer - you asked about examples and there is written that such examples do not exist. In the paper I cited mechanisms like flecks are also explained. It is all about Sun moving around Earth. I am not voting for such kind of explanations, I just may say, it may not be disproved using current state.
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty: Idea of quantum jumps is still alive together with idea of Bohm and some other ideas, but you asked about wave function.
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty: Free online version of the paper is here arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0506199 but afraid it won't make you happy. My main reason for the cite was to show that there is quite solid view that there are no any experimental evidence of collapse at all. Yet I am not demanding that in future some experiments may not to prove collapse.
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty: Then I reading early papers on QM (or even hear some colleagues nowaday) I feel, that at that time collapse was simply “an obvious thing” and so any experiment demonstrated quantum behavior could be considered as proof of collapse. Someone used comparison with idea, that “it is obvious, that Sun moves around Earth, because we see that every day.”
May
23
comment Historical background of wave function collapse
@Marty Green: Why?
May
22
answered Historical background of wave function collapse
May
20
revised Radio waves and frequency of photon
mistype corrected
May
20
answered Radio waves and frequency of photon
May
14
answered What is an observer in quantum mechanics?
May
10
answered Disproof of Bell’s Theorem
May
8
comment Can spin be infinite?
@Qmechanic: Anyway, I would like to see an example of representation you are talking about.