139 reputation
16
bio website patrickthurmond.com
location Overland Park, KS
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Feb 13 at 15:50

I am a professional web developer with two degrees in computer science. I have a background in computer (desktop and laptop) and projector repair as well as tech support for multiple companies.

I do most of my web development with PHP. I have dabbled in Ruby and Java and would like to eventually become fluent in them as well as Python, C, C++ (used this a lot in college), and a few other languages. I am pretty decent at JavaScript. I know HTML and CSS and understand more than the average developer when it comes to web design and design architectures on web platforms (mobile, responsive, grid, etc).

In my current day job I find myself mostly working in Drupal 6 and Drupal 7. But I have worked with WordPress, OpenCart, Magento (ick!), OSCommerce, CodeIgniter (framework), CakePHP (framework, not a fan) and I have a dabbled in numerous other frameworks and CMSes. I am not shy at trying new libraries, tools, and systems. I have worked with MySQL, PostGreSQL, and Oracle 8i (a little bit in college). I am also trying to learn about MongoDB and CouchDB.

My skill seems to be in finding solutions to problems that no one else can seem to solve. Either through research or just coming up with creative solutions on my own. Often times I find myself asking a question on here and then discovering or coming up with the answer on my own a few hours later. I try to curb that so that I can give credit to those that really put in the effort to help. I also try to give points to those that help even when I find a solution on my own.

I am a nerd through and through and try to absorb and analyze every bit of knowledge I come across.


Feb
13
awarded  Commentator
Feb
13
comment Would a thinner atmosphere (such as high altitude) yield better solar panel energy generation?
I can't imagine the problem for panels being much of a big deal since most satellites use them as a source of power and last for decades.
Feb
13
comment Would a thinner atmosphere (such as high altitude) yield better solar panel energy generation?
Would there be a way to minimize those voltage drops over large distances? Different materials? Maybe a room temperature super-conductor?
Mar
6
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
10
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
comment Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
Yeah, whether or not the abiogenic theory is correct is irrelevant to the bigger picture issue. And that is the pollution of our environment. Both the air and the water is getting damaged by use of oil. It makes it more and more unhealthy for us to live on this Earth. We need to find solutions that will not pollute our environment.
Oct
29
comment Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
Just as a note. No matter what the change is, new concepts and ideas that unseat commonly held ones tend to be very difficult for a society as a whole to accept. In this case, if people were to believe the abiogenic theory then environmentalists would have one less reason to push "green" tech (no limit on oil) and oil companies would have less of a reason to continue to push prices higher. So there will be a huge pushback just from those groups alone.
Oct
26
comment Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
That is a very complicated answer. But I have actually been reading about this abiogenic theory for a few weeks now and it definitely seems more plausible than the biogenic theory. My main reasoning for thinking that is simply the shear volume of oil that is pumped out of the Earth everyday combined with the fact that plant and animal life on the surface and in the oceans are constantly being broken down and recycled back into the ecosystem as food for the next generation of plants and animals. The idea that a significant amount of material from life gets buried and changed seems kinda crazy.
Oct
26
accepted The effects of nuclear warhead detonations on the Earth's environment and global warming
Oct
26
accepted Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
Oct
26
accepted Abiotic oil vs the traditional theory of oil deposit formation
Oct
25
comment Abiotic oil vs the traditional theory of oil deposit formation
Numbers 14 and 15 seem to contradict some of the earlier statements in the list. Specifically talking about the progressive breakdown at temperatures over 100 degrees. If the mantle is contaminated with biogenic organic material (which isn't surprising) then why would it not fully breakdown in the mantle before having a chance to rise once more? I may be misunderstanding these statements though.
Oct
25
asked Abiotic oil vs the traditional theory of oil deposit formation
Oct
25
comment Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
If I remember correctly the Earth entirely recycles its crust once every bilion years or so. With the Earth nearly 4 billion years old we would be on the 4th cycle of this. Given that oil is thought to come from ancient critters dying, being covered in muck and gradually being pulled underground I would think that there would be some, at least small deposits, of oil and gas near some subduction zones. We have found many deep sea deposits.
Sep
25
asked Underground explosions due to plate tectonics and natural gas pockets
Sep
18
comment The effects of nuclear warhead detonations on the Earth's environment and global warming
@RonMaimon I understand the point your getting at. But I think your example is a bit flawed. For example you can get a rash from poison ivy. But that doesn't mean that all rashes are caused by poison ivy. Trapping heat within an area/object will generally increase the temperature of the area/object. But that still requires a heat source and something trapping it. The heat can come from multiple sources and multiple things can trap heat (though far fewer things can do this on a global scale).
Sep
18
comment The effects of nuclear warhead detonations on the Earth's environment and global warming
That doesn't entirely surprise me. But I do wonder if the number of bombs exploded over a few decades can add up the damage. Volcanos like Mt. St. Helens don't blow very often.
Sep
17
asked The effects of nuclear warhead detonations on the Earth's environment and global warming
Jan
31
awarded  Supporter
Jan
31
awarded  Scholar