1,141 reputation
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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
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Aug
3
answered How do you calculate the time to emission of an electron from a metal given the incident radiation?
Jun
17
comment Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
Ben, it is hard to see how you can be absolutely sure that some of the energy for that ionization didn't come from the 1200-VDC power supply. You should read my article on Quantum Siphoning, linked elsewhere on this page by Helder Velez, where I explain how those kinds of processes can work. In my article I explain how it works for the case of the photographic plate, but I think the Geiger Counter is the same in principle.
Jun
17
comment Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
The problem with all of your "conservation of energy" arguments is that they can never be verified experimentally. The device which measures the supposedly early electron is inevitably a tube with a 1200-volt power supply or something of that kind, which is clearly capable of supplying the energy necessary for the detection event. There is no reason to think the detection energy had to come from the "photon".
Jun
16
comment Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
Ben, you're the one that introduced Compton and Black Body into the discussion, not me.So you shouldn't criticize me for going "off-topic". There's nothing in the original post about anti-correlation either. The question was about whether the "textbooks" have it wrong, meaning I would think the common undergrad textbooks with their "three nails" narrative. I think I answered the question.
Jun
16
comment Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
Ben, the textbooks dispute precisely those aspects of these phenomena which can be explained by a good semi-classical approach. And I'm not talking about BKS...you obviously haven't had time in the 16 minutes since I posted to read the articles where I show how it's done.
Jun
16
revised Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
added 14 characters in body
Jun
16
answered Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?
Jun
6
comment Problem counting spin states
OK, I finally see what this means. If we can assume that all these states are equally probable, then this distribution sort of gives you the spherical density of spin states. So I put it into a spreadsheet to see what it looked like...in particular, if it would line up with the distribution of velocities in a gas a thermal equilibrium. It was kind of close, but not all that close. I wonder what it means...
Jun
4
comment Problem counting spin states
Thanks, Lagerbaer. I've had some more thoughts on this so I added them to my question as an edit. Hope you'll check it out.
Jun
4
revised Problem counting spin states
added 1160 characters in body
Jun
2
asked Problem counting spin states
Apr
23
awarded  Yearling
Apr
5
answered What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?
Apr
5
comment What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?
I would think that in a metal, the conduction electrons would form more or less a stationary cloud, while the lattice vibrations would consist of the metal ions, accompanied by most if not all of their tightly bound electrons.
Apr
5
comment What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?
Yes, you are right, the lattice vibrations in a solid radiate just like an antenna. I think it's true that all of the thermal radiation properties of matter can be analyzed by finding the time-varying charge density (which is in principle calculable using quantum mechanics) and then just applying Maxwell's Equations to calculate the resulting radiation.
Mar
29
comment A charged sphere with pulsing radius
The other contributors so far have tried to give hints without giving away the answer, so I'm going to do the same. This problem is actually a physical description of a hydrogen atom in a superposition of the 1s and 2s states. There is a time-varying charge density in this superposition, and it is pretty much exactly what the problem here describes.
Mar
8
answered How to get the angle needed for a projectile to pass through a given point for trajectory plotting
Mar
6
answered Bessel vs. modified Bessel in radial equation of hydrogen
Mar
2
revised Solving the diffusion equation
added 174 characters in body
Mar
2
answered Solving the diffusion equation