1,206 reputation
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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 8 hours ago

Aug
13
comment In quantum mechanics, given certain energy spectrum can one generate the corresponding potential?
I started to post the opinion that David is right; but I am starting to think he is wrong, for a bizarre reason. The spectra would indeed be identical, if we are talking about the spectrum that you can measure experimentally. No experiment measures the absolute value of the ground state frequency; only the differences. But there is a problem: the half-potential includes only waveforms with odd parity, and when placed in superposition with each other, they will radiate very weakly, if at all. It is not totally obvious to me that there will even be a measurable spectrum.
Aug
12
comment How does one build up intuition in physics?
I would have thought the intuitive thing to do with this integral would be to start by setting x_0 = 0 and p_0 = 1.
Aug
9
comment Why photons transfer to electrons perpendicular momentum?
@Hans I'm sorry I didn't see this post when it first went up, or I would have asked you: why are the spin currents more important than the alternating charge layers? The charge layers are static but so are the current layers, so neither interacts with the incoming e-m wave until they are set in motion to some degree. If you are interested in explaining this, let me know and I will post it as a separate question.
Aug
6
comment How is a spherical electromagnetic wave emitted from an antenna described in terms of photons?
"If the frequency and angular momentum of the photon is known, its position - direction in which it propagates - is completely unknown". Surely Lubos wrote this in haste. The relevant uncertainties for this problem are the initial position of the "photon", presumed to be completely known, and its final momentum, presumed to be completely unknown. In fact it's a little more suttle: even for a fixed initial position, we can specify one axis along which the momentum is known to be zero; but that's as much as I can say in 600 characters or less.
Aug
5
answered Why and how exactly is electric motor torque limited?
Aug
4
answered oscillations of blocks connected by a spring
Aug
4
answered How is a spherical electromagnetic wave emitted from an antenna described in terms of photons?
Aug
1
answered Books that every layman should read
Aug
1
revised Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?
added 258 characters in body
Jul
31
asked Tracking photon color in Bell experiments
Jul
28
comment Why is the Ritz combination principle incompatible with Classical Mechanics?
I'm glad you liked it. Of course, it's only my interpretation of what Dirac might have meant; I don't know what he was really thinking.
Jul
28
comment Trying to understand the EPR paradox
OK, then I think you must be wrong. You seem to be saying that entangled particles are prepared with spin oriented in the y direction. Instead of |+-> - |-+> (singlet state)you are analyzing the case of |+-> + |-+> (triplet state)? Is that right?
Jul
28
answered Why is the Ritz combination principle incompatible with Classical Mechanics?
Jul
28
answered Trying to understand the EPR paradox
Jul
26
revised Hydrogen transition and photon behavior
added 1326 characters in body
Jul
24
answered Hydrogen transition and photon behavior
Jul
17
comment Coincidence detectors in Bell tests: How close is close enough?
OK, I mixed up micro and milliseconds, so my reading of the graph gives 10 microseconds average between events, within a factor of 2 give or take with what your revised data shows. This may be explainable by normal bunching (non-Poisson distribution of thermal etc. light). I still think the discrepancy (factor of six) in the first set of points is a little large, especially considering how much data you gave me to work with.
Jul
17
comment Coincidence detectors in Bell tests: How close is close enough?
Peter, your new data provides a tantalizing near-confirmation of my analysis of your earlier data. You have a zone 2-3 nsec wide of "entangled" events, and a second zone on the order of 100 times wider of "dark count" coincidences. Ignoring the entangled band, the "dark count" events are, on average about 10 msec apart. But you are missing the one piece of data that would tie it all together: the total elapsed time! 8000 events 10 msec apart should suggest a total elapsed time of 80 sec. This is the calculation which failed to line up in your ealier data set. Do you have the elapsed time?
Jul
17
comment Coincidence detectors in Bell tests: How close is close enough?
Let's disregard the bizarre echo for now as an experimental artifact. I "assume" Poisson statistics because there is no need to explain Poisson behavior...it just "is". The clear deviation from Poisson, which your new data brings to light, means there is some unexplained physics going on. If we extrapolate: 15,000 events within the 3 nsec band, 20,000 events within the 100 nsec band...we get all 400,000 events within an 8000 nsec band, for an average spacing between events of 4 microsec. We should therefore "expect" around 2.5 million detection events...not the 400,000 reported. What gives?
Jul
17
comment Coincidence detectors in Bell tests: How close is close enough?
to clarify my problem: to ballpark the statistics, I take the reported 380,000 Alice events (approx. 40,000 per second) and find them to be spaced on average 25000 nseconds apart. Let's call them dark counts for sake of argument. Then I ask: how often will two adjacent dark counts occur 2.5 nseconds apart? You can see there is a factor of 10,000 here, which leads to an estimate of around 4 dark count coincidences per second. But from the graph I need to justify close to 200 coincidences outside the 1-nanosecond band. So what are they?