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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
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visits member for 4 years, 4 months
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Dec
25
answered Polarisation directions in standing waves in cubical cavity
Dec
23
comment Measuring the spin of a single electron
I stumbled independently on Jared Stenson's master's thesis, and it has some things even more interesting that the paper you've flagged. The Master's Thesis is at contentdm.lib.byu.edu/ETD/image/etd908.pdf and I discuss its implications in my blog, which I've linked to in my own answer.
Dec
23
revised Measuring the spin of a single electron
added 875 characters in body
Dec
22
revised Trying to understand the EPR paradox
added 248 characters in body
Dec
21
revised Is energy conserved in decay of hydrogen atom in superposed state?
refer to supporting documentation
Dec
21
comment Is energy conserved in decay of hydrogen atom in superposed state?
For a mathematical demonstration that you cannot distinguish a collection of pure eigenstates from a system in mixed superpositions, see this earlier stackexchange discussion: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/8123/…
Dec
20
comment Is energy conserved in decay of hydrogen atom in superposed state?
The spectrum is discrete because the energy level transitions are only driven by exact frequencies. But that has nothing to do with the theory that once a transition is started it has to go all the way. I elaborate on these topics in my blog: this article marty-green.blogspot.com/2011/10/… shows how atoms behave like tiny classical antennas, and this article marty-green.blogspot.com/2011/12/… refrences a very good discussion on this site regarding alternative paradigms.
Dec
18
comment Is energy conserved in decay of hydrogen atom in superposed state?
The spectrum is exactly the same in either paradigm. The discretenesss of the spectrum has nothing to do with the supposed discreteness in the emission/absorption processes.
Dec
18
answered Is energy conserved in decay of hydrogen atom in superposed state?
Dec
7
revised Are these two quantum systems distinguishable?
follow-up on comment by OP
Dec
6
comment Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
@harry I hope you will read the article which I linked to above. In it I show how the statistics of detection are the same if you model photons or continuous waves. It seems in quantum mechanics you are really not allowed to say that just because a particle was detected here, it must have been emitted from there at such-and-such a time. It's one of those delicate balancing acts between what we're allowed to know and what we're not. A pea-shooter would hugely upset that balance.
Dec
6
comment Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
marty-green.blogspot.com/2010/02/clicking-detectors.html
Dec
5
comment Decay from excited state to ground state
Thanks, Harry. We're so deep into the comment field that it's hard to deal in more than the vaguest generalities, but it's a welcome change to have someone agree with me.
Dec
5
comment Decay from excited state to ground state
Ron, you still haven't read the articles I posted on my blog.
Dec
5
comment How is the double slit experiment modeled in contemporary physical theories?
It is interesting that the authors of the paper argue that until March of this year, my position was the correct one: that we did not yet have a pea-shooter for electrons. The authors claim to have recently gotten around this constraint. I'm betting that they haven't.
Dec
5
revised Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
responding to multiple arguments in the comments.
Dec
5
comment Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
It is true that the OP designated the velocity of the outgoing wave by c, which is usually reserved for the speed of light. It is also true that I "blithely" assumed he meant the velocity of the electron wave function. I do not understand why you take this to be evidence of some kind of character flaw on my part. As for your other points I don't have room to deal with them in the comment field so I am going to reply to them in an edit to my answer.
Dec
5
comment Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
Bingo? I doubt it. Can you use the electrons you've supposedly generated to carry out the OP's experiment? In other words, you create them at will and detect them with certainty in one of two detectors? You method with photons, of course, doesn't work: the detection statistics you get are identical to what you would have for a classical wave whose detection probability is proportional to its intensity. There are no pea-shooters for photons.
Dec
5
comment Decay from excited state to ground state
I'm pretty sure a laser is actually one of the situations where you get exact results if you treat the e-m field classically.
Dec
5
comment Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit
It's what the OP (David) talked about when he said "we tell the emitter to produce a single electron". We just don't have a way of telling our electron emitters to do that.