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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 49 mins ago

9h
comment Why are electromagnetic waves not able to pass through a hole with a diameter smaller than the wavelength?
Oh come on. If you merge the two holes into one, the diameter becomes squrt(2). And the power is 4 times: that is, diameter to the fourth. Like I said in the first place. For a correct explanation of the exponent, re-read what I wrote in my answer.
1d
answered Why are electromagnetic waves not able to pass through a hole with a diameter smaller than the wavelength?
Dec
23
answered On the foundations of quantum physics
Dec
20
answered Why can't unequal current sources be connected in series?
Dec
17
answered Derivation of the speed of light using the integral forms of Maxwell's Equations
Dec
15
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
Let's remember your starting position. Here is what you said: "You can measure the energy eigenstate of a hydrogen atom by measuring the magnetic moment of the atom, which will depend on the angular momentum of the electronic state, the energy of the electron, and the alignment of the electron's spin."
Dec
10
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
Oh come on. They both have zero orbital energy. And dont' try to squirm out of it by invoking the fine structure constant.
Dec
10
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
@jerrySchirmer no you can't measure the energy of a hydrogen atom by measuring its spin state. The 1s and 2s states have the same spin, so a hydrogen atom with a spin of 1/2 can be in any superposition of the 1s and 2s states.
Dec
10
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
Anna, downvoting my answer doesn't mean that you're right and I'm wrong.
Dec
9
revised Are these two quantum systems distinguishable?
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Dec
9
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
The density matrix is related but it's not exactly my territory. I would refer you to this interesting discussion where the people who understand density matrices show that you cannot distinguish between a system where 50% of the atoms are in an excited state versus a system where all the atoms are in a 50-50 superposition of states: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/8049/…
Dec
9
answered How does a Wavefunction collapse?
Dec
9
comment How does the hydrogen atom know which frequencies it can emit photons at?
@Lalinsky good answer. You are the only one who is remotely correct on this question. The other answers are all such nonsense.
Dec
8
revised Simple real-life examples of Fermi's golden rule?
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Dec
8
comment Simple real-life examples of Fermi's golden rule?
@JamalS Thanks for doing my latex! I don't know how I'm supposed to be smart enough to do quantum mechanics if I'm too dumb to do latex.
Dec
8
answered Simple real-life examples of Fermi's golden rule?
Dec
8
revised How far back can you trace a photon?
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Dec
7
comment How far back can you trace a photon?
Oh come on now. Does your potassium atom make an audible click when it absorbs a photon from the distant star?
Dec
7
comment How far back can you trace a photon?
Then your argument is with Richard Feynmann, not me. I more or less quoted what he calls "Proposition A" (Vol. 3, chapter 1-5 in the Feynmann Lectures)...the very proposition which he concludes is false. According to Feynmann, it is simply not true that the photon must have passed through either one slit or the other.
Dec
7
comment How far back can you trace a photon?
You start by saying you are going to "keep it simple" but then you throw in so many extraneous complications that your answer is all but incomprehensible. Let me list the things you bring up that have nothing to do with the question: the motion of the star relative to the earth, the expansion of space, existence of gravitational "wells" (?), the redshift, the blueshift, and the standard model. And why do you have a second potassium atom...and why do you think there are potassium atoms inside the detector? And how do you "see" an absorption line with a photomultiplier?