164 reputation
9
bio website about.me/mark.bolusmjak
location Toronto, Canada
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Mar 12 at 21:16

I like what Dijkstra said:

"The computing scientist's main challenge is not to get confused by the complexities of his own making." - E. W. Dijkstra

While you're here, check out my tunes
Or my Scheme-in-JavaScript: zb-lisp
Or my JSON pivoter: json.pivot
Or other code: code


Sep
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
8
awarded  Informed
May
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
12
accepted Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience?
Jan
12
awarded  Custodian
Jan
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience?
Jan
12
asked Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience?
Aug
3
awarded  Scholar
Aug
3
accepted How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
May
27
awarded  Supporter
May
27
comment How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
Bits. What is the difference between "exact" and "good enough"? We only need to be accurate enough to distinguish a number of states in agreement with the Bekenstein bound. If our resolution is higher than that, and we can simulate more states as a result, we violate the Bekenstein bound.
May
26
comment How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
@Peter Shor: Classical. I've added a thought experiment in the hopes it might clarify what I'm getting at.
May
26
awarded  Editor
May
26
revised How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
added 649 characters in body
Apr
21
comment How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
I think the key is that in order for us to care, the events must be measurable. If they are not all measurable, we don't need all of them in our simulation. see here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared_divergence
Apr
21
comment How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
"in a black body, for example, you can have an infinite number of photons". If we assume finite energy and finite space in the universe, and we can encode a 1 bit of data per photon, this disagrees with the Bekenstein bound. The other option is that although we have infinite photons, we cannot decode the information stored. So we can discard them from our simulation. no?
Apr
19
comment How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
I'd like to know if the question makes sense and if the number is finite, for use in a thought experiment.
Apr
19
awarded  Student
Apr
19
asked How many bits are needed to simulate the universe?
Apr
19
awarded  Autobiographer