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Jul
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awarded  Popular Question
Jul
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Jul
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Jun
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awarded  Popular Question
Jun
3
comment Why is the application of probability in QM fundamentally different from application of probability in other areas?
In two words: Bell's inequality.
May
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awarded  Tumbleweed
May
23
revised Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
edited title
May
23
comment Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
@Qmechanic Ok. You can edit it out if you like.
May
23
comment Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
@YvanVelenik I am mainly interested in good approximate values of the free energy and the magnetization. I edited the question to add this. If you are willing to add some details, you should post your first comment as an answer.
May
23
revised Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
added 176 characters in body
May
23
accepted The “replica trick” initial formula?
May
23
revised Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
edited title
May
22
asked Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?
May
9
comment The “replica trick” initial formula?
@AntonioRagagnin fixed.
May
9
revised The “replica trick” initial formula?
added 11 characters in body
May
9
revised The “replica trick” initial formula?
added 5 characters in body
May
9
asked The “replica trick” initial formula?
Apr
12
awarded  Yearling
Mar
18
comment Double double-slit experiment
As for the photon that you do measure, it loses the entanglement with the other photon after the measurement. And you lose the interference pattern after determining the slit through which it went.
Mar
18
comment Double double-slit experiment
I don't understand your argument. Why you say that the spatial superposition is built up during the evolution of the photons, and why this loses the entanglement? The fact that there's an uncertainty $\Delta x$ means that the second photon (the one you didn't measure) is in a superposition of states spreading through some spatial region on the order of $\Delta x$. If this spatial region is large enough as to include both slits, you have an interference pattern.