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Apr
12
awarded  Yearling
Mar
18
comment Double double-slit experiment
As for the photon that you do measure, it loses the entanglement with the other photon after the measurement. And you lose the interference pattern after determining the slit through which it went.
Mar
18
comment Double double-slit experiment
I don't understand your argument. Why you say that the spatial superposition is built up during the evolution of the photons, and why this loses the entanglement? The fact that there's an uncertainty $\Delta x$ means that the second photon (the one you didn't measure) is in a superposition of states spreading through some spatial region on the order of $\Delta x$. If this spatial region is large enough as to include both slits, you have an interference pattern.
Mar
18
comment Double double-slit experiment
+1 Good point. But I think that in the first case there should be only one interference pattern, not both. After determining through which slit the measured photon went, I'll still be ignorant as to the slit used by the second photon. So in this case I destroy the interference pattern of the measured photon (because I know which slit it used), but I still see the other interference pattern (because $\Delta x$ doesn't let me determine the slit of the non-measured photon from the slit of the measured photon).
Mar
13
revised Double double-slit experiment
added 150 characters in body
Mar
13
comment Double double-slit experiment
@CarlWitthoft "see recent experiments which seem to show that a particle's quantum state can be "found" in one slit while the particle is "seen" in the other." .... can you provide some references?
Mar
13
asked Double double-slit experiment
Jan
15
comment Consequences of the new theorem in QM?
What is GRW? Thanks.
Jan
8
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
1
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
17
accepted Does an electric field create a pH gradient?
Dec
16
comment Does an electric field create a pH gradient?
Let's also hope someone provides a more thorough physical analysis... :)
Dec
16
asked Does an electric field create a pH gradient?
Dec
13
revised Proving that interval preserving transformations are linear
edited body
Dec
9
revised Why the dissolution of hydrophobic compounds decreases the entropy of water molecules in the vicinity of the solute?
added 167 characters in body
Dec
9
revised Why the dissolution of hydrophobic compounds decreases the entropy of water molecules in the vicinity of the solute?
edited tags
Dec
9
comment Why the dissolution of hydrophobic compounds decreases the entropy of water molecules in the vicinity of the solute?
@ManishEarth Can you migrate this question to Physics.SE now? It's been almost a week. The current answer by Nicolau is helpful but it doesn't explain the physical mechanism behind the entropy decrease.
Dec
6
accepted Viscosity of water in the presence of solutes
Dec
4
asked Viscosity of water in the presence of solutes
Dec
4
comment Why the dissolution of hydrophobic compounds decreases the entropy of water molecules in the vicinity of the solute?
@ManishEarth agreed