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Jul
25
comment Proving that interval preserving transformations are linear
@Ben Crowell: Edited the question.
Jul
25
revised Proving that interval preserving transformations are linear
deleted 55 characters in body
Jul
25
comment Proving that interval preserving transformations are linear
@Ben Crowell: I think I was wrong to put it that way. Spacetime is homogeneous, isotropous, and flat, with the Minkowski metric. What I don't want to assume is any properties of homogeneity or isotropy in the coordinate transformation $\left\{y^i\right\}\leftrightarrow \left\{x^i\right\}$. All I want to assume is that the interval is preserved, and from that prove the linearity. I hope it's clearer now.
Jul
23
asked Proving that interval preserving transformations are linear
Jul
18
awarded  Supporter
Jul
18
accepted Rotations in space-time
Jul
16
asked Rotations in space-time
Jun
15
accepted Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion curves
Jun
10
comment Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion curves
If I understood your answer correctly, then I think you understood my question correctly (sorry if it was not very clear). Your answer is that there's no definite way to assign modes if the dispersion curves intersect. I think I agree with you, but I've seen dispersion curves where the authors insist in splitting the modes (NOT by symmetry properties, of this much I'm sure). Can't cite any papers as I've only seen this on conferences. Perhaps it's only for convenience, as you say.
Jun
9
awarded  Promoter
Jun
7
revised Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion curves
added 47 characters in body
Jun
7
revised Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion curves
Had forgotten to put the definitions of p and q.
Jun
7
asked Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion curves
May
29
asked errata for Morse & Feshbach - Methods of Theoretical Physics
May
29
revised Helmholtz decomposition in the plane
edited body
May
29
comment Spherical wave as sum of plane waves
@David, @Marek, I agree with @nibot. We have a tag in this site called Mathematical Physics and I think this type of question merits that tag and thus belongs to this site. Sometimes we don't need an all too rigorous or involved mathematical answer to a mathematical question and that's when a physicist's view may be helpful. So I hope this type of question doesn't get closed in the future.
May
29
awarded  Self-Learner
May
28
accepted Helmholtz decomposition in the plane
May
28
comment Helmholtz decomposition in the plane
Thanks for a very informative answer. I'm marking yours instead of mine as the answer.
May
28
answered Helmholtz decomposition in the plane