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seen Aug 14 '11 at 4:36

May
14
asked Determine the point at which the electric field is equal to zero?
May
5
awarded  Scholar
May
5
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
Can anyone point me towards some information on whether or not mass affects the damping constant? I can't find any reliable information.
May
5
accepted Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
May
3
revised Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
deleted 136 characters in body; edited title
Apr
18
comment How to determine viscous dampening coefficient of spring?
Okay, so what do I need to calculate c? As is obvious, I don't understand the maths behind the problem. If possible, can you just make up the data required and do an example calculation to find 'c' for me?
Apr
17
comment How to determine viscous dampening coefficient of spring?
Sorry, but the questions really aren't the same. I've asked a number of similar questions on the one general topic, that does not make the questions identical. @Robert: What I don't understand is how to find 'c'. Using the information I supplied in this question, what is the value of 'c'? Can you calculate it? Nobody has been able to actually calculate the value of it yet.
Apr
17
comment How to determine viscous dampening coefficient of spring?
Thanks Robert, but you didn't really. I can't use your equation (angular frequency = etc) as I don't know the angular frequency. It seems that the dampening coefficient is impossible to figure out, as not enough variables are ever known!
Apr
17
asked How to determine viscous dampening coefficient of spring?
Apr
13
asked Determine Charge With Electroscope?
Apr
13
awarded  Commentator
Apr
13
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
Perfect, thankyou!
Apr
13
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
I don't understand your accusatory tone, are users not permitted to ask two questions on the same topic?
Apr
12
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
Well the dampening could be found by measuring the decrease in amplitude each oscillation, so you would find the factor by which the amplitude decreases. Which symbol in the above equation would that be equal to though? c or λ?
Apr
12
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
I do understand most of it Georg :)
Apr
12
comment Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
Thanks Robert! This is exactly what I'm looking for. I would just measure 'k' using F=kx and altering the masses on a spring and measuring the extensions (more accurate than a stopwatch) to find k. I'm not sure how to find 'c' though, what is 'c' anyway? The 'different directions' is something I'm also very interested, do you have any additional suggestions? Thanks!
Apr
12
asked Investigating damped Harmonic Motion in a Spring?
Apr
11
comment What affects the damping of a spring?
Okay, so the variables so far are: initial extension of spring (independent), period of oscillation and time for spring to stop (dependent variable) and mass of weight on spring (independent variable). What other variables are there, or perhaps more importantly, how can I find what the other variables are?
Apr
11
comment What affects the damping of a spring?
Are you able to explain the 'second order differential equation' for dampening at the wiki you linked to? I don't understand where the equation comes from, how it's used, and none of the letters/symbols in the equation are defined on the site..
Apr
11
comment What affects the damping of a spring?
I understand what independent and dependent variables are, but not how to figure out what they are in this scenario. It seems the frictional force is one variable, and I'm assuming that would need to be a controlled variable. Judging by the 'second order differential equation' the initial extension of the string is also a variable. I assume there must be many others, but I can't find any info on the topic. Doing a simple search for 'variables in dampening shm' finds nothing.