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Jan
29
comment How does water at different temperatures behave when they are mixed?
Agreed; the question as-is is too borad and encompasses a lot of fluid dynamics.
Nov
19
comment Pressure generated by a molecule inside an enclosure
@Gert: You can define pressure even with instantaneous collisions ; then two collisions can't ever happen at the same time. However I agree that such a pressure would have some strange properties (would be anisotropic, for a start)
Nov
18
comment Pressure generated by a molecule inside an enclosure
@Gert Mostly true, although you actually only need lots of "collisions" with the walls to compute a pressure. So the question looks legit to me.
Oct
20
comment Is it possible to determine when an accelerometer is in a vibrating state compared to a non-vibrating state?
How do you define "vibration" as opposed to "free movement"? Once you clear this up, alswers will flow…
Oct
16
answered Fluid mechanics assumptions
Oct
16
comment Lagrangian is isotropic in space
Absolutely. And yes, that is actually true of other vectors as well. The classic lagrangian with an EM field is a function of $E^2$, $B^2$, and $\vec j \cdot \vec A$ only.
Oct
16
answered Lagrangian is isotropic in space
Oct
16
answered Direction of thermal radiation
Oct
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
9
answered Shorting a Superconducting Coil with A/C
Oct
8
comment Can Ultrasound and or Microwaves actually lock mass in place trapping it in standing wave nodes
I think what you're looking for is called ponderomotive force. It works (google gives plenty examples) but is limited to fairly small objects AFAIK.
Oct
7
comment Why can iron and dryer both make clothes with less wrinkles?
I'd guess heat and steam makes clothes soft (instead of elastic), and iron makes them flat. On the other gand, a dryer makes sure they dry in lots of different successive random shapes, while letting them dry statically keeps the wrinkles at the same place throughout the process.
Oct
7
comment Is cause of this equilibrium - tension or friction?
From an experimental point of view, imagine a car parked correctly (brakes on) on a slope. Put a rope from the car to your hand. However you pull on the rope, the car doesn't move. How, just looking the car not move, could anyone guess how hard you pull?
Oct
7
comment Is cause of this equilibrium - tension or friction?
Absolutely, UNLESS you add more information. Force balance perpendicular to the slope isn't giving anything concerning forces parallel to the slope. Parallel force balance gives you the sum of tension and static friction. That's it...
Oct
7
comment Do $\vec r$ and $d \vec r$ have the same direction?
That depends. Position and velocity are independent in general (you might have any velocity in a given position) so they may be perpendicular (as in circular motion) or not.
Oct
7
comment Do $\vec r$ and $d \vec r$ have the same direction?
True. This failure is typical and mostly comes from using the same letter r for position vector and for radial coordinate.
Oct
7
answered Why does public mains power use 50-60 Hz and 100-240 V?
Oct
7
revised Is cause of this equilibrium - tension or friction?
added 131 characters in body
Oct
7
answered Is cause of this equilibrium - tension or friction?
Sep
26
awarded  Yearling