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Loving Physics PhD student of Electrical engineering


Jul
18
comment Boltzmann Distribution of Electrons in Confining Potential
@user50210 Thanks, Just to ensure that I understand you, you expect the electron distribution to take the form of n0*exp(q*phi/(K*Te)) in equilibrium, am I correct?
Jul
17
comment Boltzmann Distribution of Electrons in Confining Potential
@user50210 can you please tag me when the simulation results including electron-electron interactions are ready? I have a guess but I am not sure, seeing the new results would definitely help.
Jun
25
answered Are Mach Diamonds radially symmetrical?
Mar
13
answered Why do noble gases stabilize plasma discharges?
Mar
2
answered Does corona discharge charged insulator?
Feb
15
answered Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
Feb
15
comment Is uncertainty principle a technical difficulty in measurement?
Dear anna, it is always a great pleasure to read your answers everywhere on this site. I am very happy that you are active on this site as you explain a lot of stuff in a very nice way. Thank you very much for your great answer
Jan
27
revised Geiger meter affected by plasma lamp
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
26
revised Geiger meter affected by plasma lamp
added 182 characters in body
Jan
26
answered Geiger meter affected by plasma lamp
Jan
21
answered Understanding voltage
Jan
5
comment Characteristic waves in a plasma
Thank you for information. Their definition is consistent with the definition I gave. Every solution of the characteristic polynomial represents a certain combination of directions of k,E,B. Since polarization is the direction of E, the solution of the characteristic polynomial defines the direction of E with respect to k,B. So indeed it represents the polarization. The term "characteristic waves" is not known in plasma physics as Debye length or plasma frequency. So if you used it without clarifying what it means or out of context it might cause confusion.
Jan
3
answered Where did the energy come from?
Jan
3
revised Why doesn't a particle's velocity effect the strength exerted on it by an electric field?
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Jan
2
comment Deriving the group velocity of a wave produced by some basic cosine waves with unequal amplitudes
@NickP I should have made it clear that I was referring to electromagnetic waves (I don't know a lot about water waves). This question was a continuation to another question about EM waves, so I kept speaking on that topic
Jan
2
answered Why doesn't a particle's velocity effect the strength exerted on it by an electric field?
Dec
25
awarded  Fanatic
Dec
21
comment Axial forces on a solenoid windings
Thanks for your feedback. I made a mistake in specifying the length in which the current flows. It should be 2*pi*r which will give a correct expression for force. Modifying it is too much effort, I will delete my answer. With respect to variable vs constant thing, say you have a function f(x,y) and you want to compute the derivative with respect to y of the definite integral of f(x,y) over y, the result will be 0. Anyway that doesn't apply here because you are computing the force at the edge of integral volume. If you wanted to compute the force inside the volume my argument would be right.
Dec
20
answered Characteristic waves in a plasma
Dec
20
comment Characteristic waves in a plasma
Could you please give a reference to "characteristic waves", as Maxim said there are a lot of possible wave modes to propagate in plasma. Providing a reference will help us to give you an answer