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Nov
20
comment Is there proof gravity bends space or is it just the most convenient explanation?
I'm not sure, as there is no real quantized theory of gravity (so far :). I guess it's the premise of the question which was a bit optimistic. I noted that the OP added an edit to the question as well about this.
Nov
19
comment Is there proof gravity bends space or is it just the most convenient explanation?
I agree with daniel - the issue was not whether GR is accurate, but has to do with interpretation. Interpretations are important, because they guide the mind when innovating and finding new ideas, among others. From a GPS engineer's point of view, it's of course irrelevant, but from a researcher's PoV it might be instructive to try to see things in other ways sometimes. Having said that, I think the current graviton models are for conceptually modelling quantum gravity in the weak field limit.
Nov
12
comment What is the cause for the inclusion of 'thermal equilibrium' in the statement of Ergodic hypothesis?
Yes - the system can explore the possible configurations of the system, without bias. Thermal equilibrium really just means that the temperature has become homogenous throughout the system, not that the system has stopped moving. Of course at zero temperature, the state won't change at all, but at any non-zero temperature, there is a chance that the system will move between states (more easily if more thermal energy is available). This "state-hopping" can be quantified by statistical mechanics. Maybe have a look at this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_fluctuations
Nov
12
comment What is the cause for the inclusion of 'thermal equilibrium' in the statement of Ergodic hypothesis?
The definition you started your post with is good. You just have to realize that equilibrium is a temporal process and not a statement of which single state is "in most equilibrium"..
Nov
12
answered What is the cause for the inclusion of 'thermal equilibrium' in the statement of Ergodic hypothesis?
Sep
28
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
19
comment Isn't the 'slit' in a double-slit experiment also a wave?
The collision you talk about between a "slit electron" and your probe electron would be an exchange of virtual photons (the messenger particles of the EM force), causing the scattering. Electrons don't really collide classically (same place at the same time) just like you conclude.
Jun
25
comment Heisenberg uncertainty principle clarification
the experiments just illustrate the issue in a graphically simple way. also like I explained, the "uncertainty" arises because you try to impose redundant descriptions on the quantum state. there really is no such thing as a momentum of a particle (if you're working in the position basis) or vice versa, and it's not an artifact of measurement. to be honest, i think the last half of your question has some misunderstandings.. you can't take the classical concepts of position and momentum and particle and end up with modern QM/QFT without a fair amount of confusion (which is normal :).
Jun
25
answered Heisenberg uncertainty principle clarification
Jun
12
comment According to calculations why the current of a battery of a mobile is high?
you are calculating the total current you would get if you could extract all the energy from the battery in one single second. it's theoretically sound but a cellphone battery can't be discharged as fast as that. however, some batteries you CAN discharge so you can melt metal if you short them :)
Jun
11
comment Explosion in a sphere and the Gravitational field outside
I'm pretty sure the external asymptotic metric is static; the hypothetical symmetric nuclear explosion does not exhibit a quadrupole moment and therefore has no gravitational field emission. Also it just rearranges the 4D vectors of particles and switches around some of them, keeping the total mass-energy in the volume constant, and I guess the Newtonian limit assumes a re-calculation of the source region in terms of Newtonian mass. As an extreme non-Newtonian case, consider a star's energy worth of pure photons, gravitating.
Jun
10
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
9
comment What is the difference between the phase in molecular orbitals and the actual complex phase component of the wave function?
As a sidenote, a complex valued function also includes the purely real values. In your px, you can set phi to 0 or pi, for example.
Jun
9
answered What exactly is a dimension?
Jun
3
awarded  Popular Question
May
30
comment reactions in molecular dynamics simulations
Regarding Na / Cl, they are not binding by covalent means so their (often intermittent) binding is indeed modeled by MD forcefields. Creating salt-crystals or similar is probably not what the ff parameters is optimized for though.
May
25
comment Violation of conservation of energy?
@WetSavannaAnimalakaRodVance Thanks, the lesson is you run into problems when you try to handwave in answers ;) I guess the core of what I meant was that you have to consider the source emission in the analysis and not just that "there is a photon to start with, now what happens". And as you note in your interesting writeup of maxwell<->one-photon QED states, there are many analysis methods possible to reach the conclusion.
May
23
answered How often does a GPS receiver receive microwave signals from satellites?
May
23
comment Violation of conservation of energy?
This answer is interesting if you do try to model the source as a classical emitter! I think maybe it ends up in conflict with the premise or spirit of the question as a philosophical question of perfect destructive interference though.