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I study physics, mathematics and informatics at Utrecht University in The Netherlands. I have participated in the International Physics Olympiad 2013. I also like to participate in programming contests, such as the Dutch and International Codecup, and the Informatics Olympiad. I usually use C++ but I know all of the following languages to a larger or lesser extend:

  • C/C++
  • Java
  • C#
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • BlitzBasic/Blitz3D/BlitzPlus
  • (HTML4/CSS)
  • A (tiny) bit of ASP.NET

During programming, Google, and existing StackOverflow-posts are my biggest friends!


Feb
8
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
3
comment Does the weight of an hourglass change when sands are falling inside?
@DarioP Ah yes, that's a really nice way of proving it, thanks.
Dec
3
comment Does the weight of an hourglass change when sands are falling inside?
How can you be sure that the average weight of the stone is exactly the same as the weight of the stone in rest? That doesn't seem at all trivial to calculate.
Nov
13
comment Potential energy in $E_f^2=(mc^2)^2+(pc)^2$?
-1 Everything you said is true, but it doesn't have anything to do with the question of the OP.
Nov
3
awarded  Quorum
Nov
3
reviewed Reviewed What forces are exerted on a clothespin in space?
Oct
24
revised Circumference of a circular path
added 1 characters in body
Oct
17
comment How accurate is Newtonian Gravity?
Possible duplicate: physics.stackexchange.com/q/52165
Oct
17
comment Time to travel distance given acceleration/deceleration
Please cite the complete question, as well as an accurate description of what you have tried so far, and where you get stuck.
Oct
12
comment Why in Newton's law of gravity, we do $M_1 \times M_2$ and not $M_1 + M_2$?
@Stupid Yes it is. If the force between the earth and a small and large satelite in its orbit would be roughly the same (as would be the case with addition), then there wouldn't be a great enough force on the large satelite to keep it in orbit (or too much on the small satelite). We know that the mass of satelites doesn't matter for their orbits. Multiplication fits all of the observations, addition doesn't. It's that simple.
Oct
8
comment How fast does light travel through a fibre optic cable?
Of course the relative difference is going to be the same. But there is a very significant absolute difference. The OP seems to ask two questions: (1)'How fast does light travel trough a fiber optic cable?', (2)'How much does the reflection matter'. You already answered (2), now you also answered (1) :) Plus, it's always nice if your answer is right in numbers as well as concept :)
Oct
8
comment How fast does light travel through a fibre optic cable?
I assume this is for a multi-mode cable? In a single-mode cable the light will pretty much follow the cable, without bouncing around much. Although there are probably some other complexities that arise because of this.
Oct
8
comment How fast does light travel through a fibre optic cable?
The refractive index of glass is about 1.5. So instead of $c$, why not use $\frac{2}{3}c$? This is definitely a very significant difference.
Oct
7
revised Ideal Gas Constant
edited body
Oct
7
comment Ideal Gas Constant
The beta factor determines how quickly higher energies become less likely. If the beta factor is big (so low temperature), high energies are very unlikely relative to low energies. If the beta factor is small (high temperature), high energies are a lot less unlikely. 'Energy' can refer to all kinds of forms of energy. In case of an ideal gas, your only talking about the kinetic energy of a single atom. You could also think of the gravitational energy if you want to work out the distribution of the atmosphere around earth. In real gasses you also have to think of the energy of interactions.
Oct
7
revised Where does the energy of a light bulb come from?
added 9 characters in body
Oct
7
comment Where does the energy of a light bulb come from?
@OlinLathrop Hmm, yeah good point. What kind of material is used?
Oct
7
comment Ideal Gas Constant
It is correct to think of temperature as a measure of the average kinetic energy. But temperature is defined in terms of the energy distribution. So the factor of proportionality between the energy scale and temperature scale is also defined in terms of this distribution, not in terms of the total or average energy. This is why an extra term appears.
Oct
7
revised Circumference of a circular path
deleted 1 characters in body
Oct
7
answered Circumference of a circular path