208 reputation
18
bio website
location Colorado
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jun 27 at 16:30

Yet another C# .NET developer.

  • C#
  • WPF
  • LINQ
  • Entity Framework
  • Winforms
  • ASP.NET/JQuery

Mar
7
awarded  Yearling
Feb
8
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
2
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
29
awarded  Quorum
Mar
24
comment Is there any inherent danger in operating a Thermonuclear Reactor?
According to ITER the temperature needed to start and sustain thermonuclear reaction on earth is 10 times that of the temperature required to do the same at the core of the sun. This temperature is 150 million degrees celsius and while it is clear that this temperature will be localized to an extremely small area it is still a huge temperature and the energy required to achieve and sustain this temperature must be just enormous...
Mar
24
revised Is there any inherent danger in operating a Thermonuclear Reactor?
added 356 characters in body
Mar
24
awarded  Editor
Mar
24
revised Is there any inherent danger in operating a Thermonuclear Reactor?
added 73 characters in body; added 2 characters in body
Mar
24
asked Is there any inherent danger in operating a Thermonuclear Reactor?
Mar
18
awarded  Student
Mar
18
comment Since radioactive material decays how is it possible that there is any left after 4.5 billion years?
Great answer, thanks.
Mar
18
awarded  Scholar
Mar
18
awarded  Supporter
Mar
18
accepted Since radioactive material decays how is it possible that there is any left after 4.5 billion years?
Mar
18
comment Since radioactive material decays how is it possible that there is any left after 4.5 billion years?
I thought that half-life of U238 is measured in millions of years, if it is about the age of the Earth, that, in combination with some shorter half-life radioactive elements being the products of the decay of other radioactive elements, explains everything. Thanks.
Mar
18
asked Since radioactive material decays how is it possible that there is any left after 4.5 billion years?
Mar
18
awarded  Autobiographer