1,163 reputation
828
bio website physicistkennethmui.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jul 18 at 20:00

Graduated physics major and math minor from Drexel University. I want to study entanglement and how to use it to do quantum teleportation on a larger scale.


May
3
comment How does one subtract two light beams?
So are you basically saying that we can use the homodyne measurement technique but to make one beam 180 degrees shifted before combining them together at a beam combiner? So this means I can get x2 - x1
Apr
4
comment Exploiting the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle as a means to communicate
I am an undergraduate physics student and have not taken graduate level quantum mechanics that uses the trace and notation you've shown here. I do not follow completely, but I get the idea. Are you talking about a single position measurement or multiple measurements in an ensemble of entangled pairs? I believe that the single measurement case, you can't control the outcome. However, I'm not concerned with the single measurement outcome. I'm looking at the standard deviation of multiple position measurements. Does your answer address this and I've missed it completely?
Apr
4
comment Exploiting the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle as a means to communicate
The only equation needed is the standard deviation equation, which everyone knows and the entanglement relation in terms of position and momentum. This is x1 = x2 and p1 = -p2, where x1 is position measurement of particle 1 in Lab A and x2 is position measurement of particle 2 in Lab B. The observables measured is the position and momentum measurement of an atom. There really isn't any other equation needed.
Apr
4
comment Exploiting the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle as a means to communicate
I did mention that Alice makes a measurement on an ensemble of her particles with each of her particles entangled with Bob's particles. Each ensemble represents one bit. Moreover, Alice and Bob agree ahead of time that Alice only measures position and Bob only measures momentum. They also have synchronized clocks and measure at the same time or very close in time interval.
Apr
1
comment Identical fermions in the same quantum state
I am basically stating, "We can distinguish two Hydrogen Atoms from the fact that they are located at different locations." If the two Hydrogen Atoms were to overlap their wave functions, then we can't tell them apart. The exceptions I was talking about was about how Bosons are indistinguishable. I am trying to understand what we can say is different or the same in the most fundamental way possible.
Mar
31
comment Identical fermions in the same quantum state
Okay, so to solidify my understanding, if we consider two electrons in the potential of two hydrogen nuclei, then we have two electrons that are distinguishable because of the fact that the two protons are located at a different locations. Everything technically is distinguishable because of space time itself? With the exception of Bosons? Ex: two photons with same energy that are overlapped traveling the same direction and in phase, or Bose Einstein condensates with atoms all collapsed in the same location with ground state energy?
Mar
31
comment Identical fermions in the same quantum state
Okay, say I have two ions then. Can their remaining electrons be in the same orbital, same energy state, and same spin state? Can this happen if the two ions are separated by a large distance?
Mar
30
comment Identical fermions in the same quantum state
I did not think of the hydrogen as a boson! I guess my question would be if I picked an element that is a fermion, say Lithium atoms?
Mar
25
comment Experimental perspective in understanding the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle
When you say, "so the probability distributions hold for a single measurement too." Do you mean, if we had calculated the probability distribution through solving the wavefunction with the appropriate potential, then a single measurement would be equivalent to a random pick from that calculated distribution?
Mar
7
comment Quantum Teleportation Fidelity
Okay, if I understand you now, you've shown an example where the two particles in the example are different, so only information is exchanged, and no physical state is transferred. It illuminates how it doesn't matter at all about physical states, all the matters here is the information transfer. I am very interested in this field of research and I am looking to apply to IQC for an internship and possibly for grad school. Could I get your email? I wish to discuss with you more about quantum information.
Mar
7
comment Quantum Teleportation Fidelity
I think I understand better now. I am fixated on the physical system itself and not the information it represents. We can still have imperfect physical state transfers, yet retain the information aspect. Therefore, it is still useful? Since the physical system is not perfectly transferred from Alice to Bob, then it would mean that the system that's "teleported" isn't really the same physical state, but a physical state that retains the important information you'd wish to transfer in Bob's hands.
Jan
3
comment Does Kepler's law only apply to planets?
Since all you need is an inverse square central attractive potential between two bodies, then it applies to any two oppositely charged particles as well, because the Coulomb Force is essentially the same form as the Gravitational Force.
Jan
3
comment Is the spin state of an atom related to the polarization of the photon it spontaneously emits?
Here is a link to the actual paper: I can't find a free version though. :( prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v85/i26/p5639_1
Jan
3
comment Why does the shadow of the hairs on my leg seemingly only appear when the leg is moving slowly?
What your referring to probably has to do with reference frames. Although you are not moving, the tree is moving due to the wind being blown. Therefore, there are moments when sunlight directly hits you, and moments when it's indirect, because the tree is blocking the sunlight. When you don't have a bright enough light, you won't be able to make out small thin shadows. Kinds like when your sitting inside a train adjacent to another train. When your train moves vs. the other train makes it look as though the scenario is the same. Something is moving relative to another, in your case, the tree
Jan
2
comment How can the surface of a liquid exist if there are no attracting molecules above it?
The upwards force is provided by Newton's 3rd Law. "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction..."
Dec
28
comment How does rest mass become energy?
Okay, I understand that there is a mathematical cancelling effect. So do you mean that if the canceling isn't perfect, then that's why only a small percentage is converted into energy? When fusion happens, anti-particles are not involved. So, how does these two hydrogen atoms fuse? How do they "cancel" each other out partially?
Dec
21
comment What is in the space between a nucleus of an atom and its electrons?
Also, the person who's asking the question is mentally transitioning between the classical picture to the quantum one. It wouldn't help to blast a whole Tsunami of information in their face.
Dec
21
comment What is in the space between a nucleus of an atom and its electrons?
Chris Gerig, you've got to keep in mind the person who asked the question. Yeah, sure its filled with virtual particles. But the original person who asked the question is gonna get confused by this. Unless you now explain virtual particles too. Please do! So that it adds more depth to the answer.
Dec
21
comment What is in the space between a nucleus of an atom and its electrons?
Anna V. I agree with you. Perhaps Chris Gerig can do this for us. He seems very passionate about how my answer is wrong.
Nov
30
comment Velocity of real gas molecules?
In that case, like I've stated, you'll need to find some extra term that's added or subtracted to the ideal gas law that applies to the real gas you are talking about. That extra term is currently not there and physicists don't bother to find an extra correction because the ideal gas law works pretty well already. However, this gives more reason for you to try to find it! Perhaps you'll rewrite textbooks! :D