1,188 reputation
1934
bio website physicistkennethmui.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Aug 4 at 22:46

Graduated physics major and math minor from Drexel University. I want to study entanglement and how to use it to do quantum teleportation on a larger scale.


Nov
2
accepted Could we use particle colliders as fusion generators?
Nov
2
comment Could we use particle colliders as fusion generators?
Wow. This is a great answer! I was missing a lot of factors that go into it like you've pointed out. However, I didn't know that the collisions of the protons are smaller than a joule per pair. This seems confusing.
Nov
2
asked Could we use particle colliders as fusion generators?
Nov
2
asked How would one calculate the amount of water contained in a cloud?
Nov
1
asked What arrangement of sound waves would be needed to heat air in a typical sized room?
Oct
30
comment Controlling the outcome of a quantum measurement through translational entanglement
By having atom detectors surrounding the harmonic trap, such that if it hits the walls surrounding it, it must mean its not in the trap. Or use a lower power light source, low enough that it will not give energy to the atom in the trap for it to escape. Of course the scientist at Lab B will do this at a specified time, or else he will ruin the entanglement before messages are sent. So you are limited to certain times of sending messages
Oct
29
accepted Controlling the outcome of a quantum measurement through translational entanglement
Oct
29
comment Controlling the outcome of a quantum measurement through translational entanglement
Yes, once you measure it, they stop being entangled. However, I'm suggesting that you can control the position measurement because you choose to measure the position very precisely! I know that it has been established that you can't do it with spin or discrete variables like that because you CAN't control the outcome. However, I'm suggesting this scheme does. This scheme would also mean that you have limited amount of messages to send.
Oct
24
comment Why do green lasers appear brighter and stronger than red and blue lasers?
Found something helpful: ehow.com/info_8059871_astronomical-laser-pointers.html Apparently, we see green light approximately 50 times brighter than red
Oct
24
answered Why do green lasers appear brighter and stronger than red and blue lasers?
Oct
19
comment Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables
physics.stackexchange.com/questions/39363/…
Oct
19
comment Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables
Wait, I just got confused from your comment. Can you re-explain that? So testing my understanding by asking another question... Let's say we replace the input particle to be a Hydrogen molecule. There are position statistics regarding the two Hydrogen atoms making up the molecule. Say we have TWO entangled pairs, (4 particles). Can we simultaneously interact two entangled particles with the Hydrogen molecule, and then teleport the position statistics to the two corresponding entangled atoms? Thus, turn the two atoms into a molecule? Look at my other question I asked:
Oct
19
comment Distinguishing identical particles
My best educated guess is that yes, it is problematic that you say they are non-interacting. After taking any two identical particles, I can't think of why they wouldn't interact with each other. I guess two photons of different energy wouldn't, but they can't be in a stationary state, they move. Also, learning about stationary states is just the preliminaries of QM. You have to add on the time portion. SO even if the math does says something weird, it maybe because the math isn't accurately describing physical reality. Remember, math only describes reality, it does not dictate it.
Oct
19
revised Distinguishing identical particles
added 812 characters in body
Oct
19
answered Distinguishing identical particles
Oct
18
comment Controlling the outcome of a quantum measurement through translational entanglement
Entanglement is given by equation (9) in this paper: prola.aps.org/abstract/PR/v47/i10/p777_1 Also, the teleportation of quantum states using translational entanglement is located here: pra.aps.org/abstract/PRA/v49/i2/p1473_1 More references to the nature of entanglement: (I recommend looking at this paper) arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9909021
Oct
18
asked Controlling the outcome of a quantum measurement through translational entanglement
Oct
18
comment Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables
This is the first fantastic answer! This gets right to the point of what I'm asking. So from what I understand now is that the measurement statistic is teleported. I'm imagining we have 3 Hydrogen atoms, two of them entangled with one in Lab A and Lab B, then if we interact a third Hydrogen with Hydrogen at Lab A, then the measurement statistic of that input Hydrogen will manifest at Lab B where that Hydrogen is sitting? The "position" of the Hydrogen at Lab B before teleportation will remain the same but the position statistics of the input Hydrogen is teleported?
Oct
18
accepted Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables
Oct
16
asked Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables