16,188 reputation
12251
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location Vancouver, Canada
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen yesterday

Mostly C++ programmer in Vancouver.
Specialising in image processing, 3d modeling, Lidar - I'm really a physicist


Sep
5
comment Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
@David - nice of them to provide a fiducial but doubling the amount of c14 is a pain!
Sep
4
comment Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
@David - yes the calibration gets trickier but you probably wouldn't C14 date an artifact from the 60s
Sep
4
awarded  Revival
Sep
3
answered Accidental benefits of seeking perpetual motion? (Science history)
Sep
3
revised How do we know that C14 decay is exponential and not linear?
added 71 characters in body
Sep
2
comment How do we know that C14 decay is exponential and not linear?
AC's answer below is better - if the atoms/coins are independant and have no way of effecting or signaling each other to decay then exponential is the only possible function. It takes a bit of thinking about to believe it though!
Sep
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
2
revised How do we know that C14 decay is exponential and not linear?
added 5 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
added 150 characters in body
Sep
2
comment Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
@jonathon - it doesn't matter, carnivores eat things that recently ate plants. Compared to the 6000yr half life of C14 eating a 2year old deer rather than fresh plants is pretty irrelevant
Sep
1
revised Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
added 20 characters in body
Sep
1
answered How reliable is Radiometric dating? Are there limitations?
Sep
1
answered Leaching of radiometric material, is it possible?
Sep
1
answered Formula for getting energy required to accelerate to a certain speed?
Sep
1
answered How do we know that C14 decay is exponential and not linear?
Aug
30
answered Assuming an observer is 50 light years away, in the plane of the solar system and observing earth, what is the light flux of earth he would see?
Aug
22
answered What are the differences between the terms flammable, inflammable, and non-flammable?
Aug
22
answered Amateur Stargazing (30 degrees N)
Aug
21
comment Why are downed power lines dangerous?
A grid isn't the same as a net, you ultimatley only have one cable to a customer. If a larger powerline goes down the last point you can switch it may also connect to other lines - the problem is that high power remote switches are big, expensive and create reliability problems themselves, so you have them on a large scale and then manually operated pole/transformer switches on a smaller scale that you have to send a crew to
Aug
21
comment Why are downed power lines dangerous?
@Mason when a line breaks you can kill the power when you detect that you have a break. The problem is that the nearest place you can disconnect the power may not be just the broken section. It's better to leave a broken live line fenced off than turn off power to a dozen city blocks containing a hospital or fire station