Reputation
6,103
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
5 26
Newest
 Revival
Impact
~122k people reached

Feb
4
comment Time-Evolution of a 3-State System
Use the time dependent schroedinger equation
Feb
3
answered What is the intuition behind this acceleration formula?
Jan
24
comment Why does metal make sound when it is hit?
This is quite a broad question. Tell us more about what you already know. For example, what do you already know about sound?
Jan
21
reviewed Approve Question Regarding torricelli's theorem/Law
Jan
19
comment Available energy in centre of mass system
What does your quantity $E$ represent?
Dec
26
revised Calculating moment of inertia for a cylinder?
added 357 characters in body
Dec
26
answered Calculating moment of inertia for a cylinder?
Dec
25
comment Calculating moment of inertia for a cylinder?
The moment of inertia of one of your chords of mass $dm$ is not $dm R^2$ because the chord is not a point mass. Its spatial extent gives it a larger moment of inertia. To find how much larger than $dm R^2$ the chord's moment of inertia is, I would use the parallel axis theorem and the moment of inertia of a rod. Then you should get the right answer. Feel free to right up a complete answer for yourself if this works.
Dec
9
answered Proving that the Center of Mass of a solid sphere is at the origin
Dec
8
comment Infinite bits to describe a qubit
@DilithiumMatrix I was thining a computable number is one where you can give an algorithm for determining the number to arbitrary precision. This algorithm can be represented in a finite number of bits, and I would say the algorithm itself is a representation of the number it computes. Thus you can represent any computable number in a finite number of bits by associating the number with its algorithm. Maybe I am being too loose in what it means to represent a number with a sequence of bits.
Dec
8
comment Infinite bits to describe a qubit
I meant to say that describing any non-computable number requires and infinite number of bits. But computable numbers can be represented in a finite number of bits.
Dec
8
comment Infinite bits to describe a qubit
Your point #1 is wrong. Any computable number could be represented by a finite number of bits. If you replace "irrational" with "real" then the statement is correct. Your second point is correct. However, when he says "precisely" in the original quote, I think he means that there can't be any error, so you really would need an infinite number of bits.
Dec
7
revised How is it possible to pull out derivatives of a wavefunction?
edited body
Dec
7
revised More intuition in understanding diffusion
added 3 characters in body
Dec
6
comment More intuition in understanding diffusion
I think your statements are correct. As for as recommendations, I don't really know much about SDE's myself. I guess I would look for books on math.se if I were you. Here are some links I found. math.stackexchange.com/q/1206722/75297, math.stackexchange.com/q/1028502/75297
Dec
6
answered More intuition in understanding diffusion
Nov
25
comment Difference between mechanical modes and phonons
I would say no. You just take your microscopic hamiltonian and find all the normal modes. Then you make a somewhat arbitrary distinction that the ones that look like plane waves are phonons, and the ones that look different because they see the boundary conditions are what he calls mechanical modes.
Nov
25
answered Difference between mechanical modes and phonons
Nov
18
comment Rotation of Spin-operator
So you worked on the right hand side. Why don't you "attack" the left hand side of (i) and see what happens.
Nov
18
comment Rotation of Spin-operator
It seems like your on the right track. Try it and tell us what happens. Also, you should always make sure to make it clear what your question is. Currently, you don't actually have a question in your "question".