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Apr
14
comment What role does the center of mass play in this situation? (electric potential)
I believe the figure was made by LookAtTheBigPicture, not by the whoever originally made the question, so it may not be that high quality. In the text of the problem, it says that the strings make a square. It also says that the motion is oscillatory, which is not true in your interpretation.
Apr
14
comment What role does the center of mass play in this situation? (electric potential)
If you read the problem statement, it explains what is going on: "The string between the two charged masses is cut". So there is a string joining the two charges, but then the string is cut so the charges can move away from each other.
Apr
11
reviewed Approve Why treat complex scalar field and its complex conjugate as two different fields?
Apr
8
revised Confusion on relativistic electromagnetism of two charge particles
made greek alpha bold with boldsymbol instead of mathbf.
Apr
7
answered Confusion on relativistic electromagnetism of two charge particles
Apr
6
comment Coulomb gauge and vector identites
It's a surface term.
Apr
1
comment Force by torque or force by speed with make the body jump?
It is hard to understand what is going on. Could you upload a picture of your object? Or maybe try to do a better job explaining it?
Mar
23
comment laws of motion while climbing a rope
You understand it perfectly. The tension provides an upward force of $mg+ma$. That is how the man is able to go up the rope. In the man's frame you have an additional non-inertial force of $ma$ pointing downwards as you say, so the man does not accelerate in his own frame.
Mar
22
comment Imaginary Part of the Free Energy - Sohotski Plemenj theorem
@AccidentalFourierTransform Ya that is what I meant. Nice answer.
Mar
22
comment Imaginary Part of the Free Energy - Sohotski Plemenj theorem
I think you should add that the $i \pi f(0)$ term contains a $P$ because the singularity occurs at $\nu = 4 \alpha /P$, so the $i \pi f(0)$ term is really a $i \pi f( 4 \alpha /P)$ term, which clearly contains a $P$. He asked about this in his first edit.
Mar
22
answered The effects of heat and work on a system
Mar
4
answered Virial theorem and the energy in a gas
Feb
27
answered Feynman Lectures on Physics, Michelson Morley question about angle of light
Feb
25
comment Explanation for a much simpler version of the twin paradox?
@AxiomaticNexus Your description of what happens is wrong. You incorrectly assumed both clocks show the same time immediately after they start to move. What actually happens is you see the other person's clock ahead of yours, but running slow, so when you meet up you have the same time. There is no contradiction.
Feb
25
comment Explanation for a much simpler version of the twin paradox?
@AxiomaticNexus Bob's clock runs slow in Alice's frame, and Alice's clock runs slow in Bob's frame. In the lab frame, they both run a little slow, but they run at the same speed as each other. Can you elaborate more on where the contradiction is? I am not able to see one. You say Bob's clock will absolutely tick slower than Alice's. I am not sure what you mean by "absolute" here. Could you please explain that more? I would say neither one "absolutely" runs slower, because the one that is slower depends on reference frame.
Feb
22
revised Why is $\textbf{D}$ the response to $\textbf{E}$?
edited body
Feb
17
comment Explanation for a much simpler version of the twin paradox?
@BySymmetry I think he means they are initially a light year apart in their common initial reference frame. They can agree on when the experiment starts, say by having some one go to the midpoint between them and flash a light.
Feb
17
answered Explanation for a much simpler version of the twin paradox?
Feb
13
comment Why was quantum mechanics regarded as a non-deterministic theory?
You said, "The time-evolution of state vector is perfectly deterministic". This is not true. In the copenhagen interpretation, where wave-function collapse is a non-deterministic process.