3,593 reputation
41537
bio website psiepsilon.wikia.com
location abhimanyu.ps@outlook.com
age 15
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jul 24 at 14:09

I'm active on http://physicsoverflow.org, which includes a graduate-level+ discussion forum as well as a community peer review system (disclosure: I moderate the site, and was among the co-founders.)

I am not so active here any longer, mostly due to the censorious moderation and irrevocable network-wide policies that I don't consider useful for an academic community.


Jul
24
revised Why there is no Gibb's phenomenon in QM?
deleted 202 characters in body
Jul
3
comment A dictionary of string - standard physics correspondences
This question has received a couple of answers on PhysicsOverflow.
Jun
30
comment Why are there no branes in heterotic string theory?
Actually, there are branes in heterotic string theory, but they just don't behave as boundary conditions for fundamental strings. See here for an answer.
Jun
29
awarded  Pundit
Jun
20
comment Some questions about Weyl spinor algebra
This question has received an answer on PO.
Jun
20
comment Quantum mechanic particle
@Qmechanic Are you sure you meant to add the "supersymmetry" (or for that matter, "operators") tag here?
Jun
20
comment What equation do we use to measure the energy level of a string, to determine it's “particle correlation”
@CuriousOne That's not true - the MSSM is found in many string vacua. The "lack of progress with it in particle physics" is a different, and historical issue. String theory currently is formulated very differently from its origins in QCD.
Jun
20
comment What equation do we use to measure the energy level of a string, to determine it's “particle correlation”
(contd.) and then use the mass ratios from the mass spectrum to compute the mass of other particles.
Jun
20
comment What equation do we use to measure the energy level of a string, to determine it's “particle correlation”
The mass spectrum string theory is just $m=\sqrt{N-a}$ (in appropriate natural units), where $N$ is the so-called "number operator" that takes non-negative integer and half-integer values. $a$ is 1 in the bosonic string theory, and 0 or 1/2, depending on the sector, for superstrings. Of course, the natural units involve setting the string length to 1, so the mass spectrum actually only allows the calculation of mass ratios, obtaining the mass in S.I. units would need experimental measurement (existing experimental measurement is enough. You can just use, e.g. the mass of the electron, (contd.)
Jun
19
comment Particle position and speed
Woah, this is one confused question. The wave in question is a probability amplitude. It has nothing to do with the momentum of the particle being zero or non-zero.
Jun
19
comment Supermultiplet dimensions from Young Tableaus
The OP of the answer temporarily deleted it, I think. It should be back now.
Jun
16
comment Supermultiplet dimensions from Young Tableaus
I haven't read it in detail yet, but this answer should answer your question.
May
24
comment How can we see that a 4D N = 2 sigma model will yield a 3D N = 4 sigma model when compactified on a circle?
See here for a pretty detailed answer.
May
2
comment Is the Hilbert space spanned by both bound and continuous hydrogen atom eigenfunctions?
There's a nice answer, as well as some corrections on the answer below at PhysicsOverflow
Apr
25
comment In an elastic collision, can we choose between cons. of energy and cons. of momentum?
Both are conserved in elastic collisions. Not sure what you mean by "choose" - you simply use whatever's important to find out whatever you want to find out. A general elastic collision with known masses and initial velocities is usually solved with both.
Apr
25
comment Does relativity in any way “disprove” Newton?
No it does not - you should probably unsubscribe from whatever magazine you're reading. Relativity supersedes Newtonian mechanics, but Newtonian mechanics is still found at a low-energy approximation of Relativity.
Apr
25
comment Does it mean the molecules of all matter above absolute zero temperature are moving?
Of course the answer is a "yes" - you answered your own question, the molecules have energy from vibration.
Apr
21
awarded  Yearling
Apr
9
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
25
awarded  Enlightened