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location Poland
age 36
visits member for 1 years
seen Aug 28 '13 at 21:14

There are things that are so serious that you can only joke about them.

― Werner Heisenberg


Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Feb
10
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
22
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
3
awarded  Editor
Jul
3
revised Does ABS shorten stopping distance of a car?
changed title as I understand the way ABS works
Jul
3
comment Does ABS shorten stopping distance of a car?
@Noldig yes, I understand this and have written this twice. But I met opinions that it also shortens distance of stopping. Well, I am not sure now about this experiment on ice, if it was correctly performed. I'm however sure, that the systems that enlarges stopping distance would have not been so widely accepted.
Jul
3
asked Does ABS shorten stopping distance of a car?
Jul
2
answered Power transfer in a transformer
Jul
2
awarded  Critic
Jun
28
comment Why does wet skin offer less resistance?
Well, yes, some osmotic changes within salt of skin can occur, but I don't know the impact of this.
Jun
28
comment About electric current analogy
It was always a good analogy to water (that's why we say that current flows). You have a pump (voltage source) which takes water from earth to some height (voltage level). If it can fall down it does with some speed -- current. This analogy was so strong that it was very hard to understand AC: why should we put water 50 or 60 times a second in opposite directions?
Jun
28
answered Why does wet skin offer less resistance?
Jun
28
comment Current Through a Circuit with an 8 Resistor Setup
@Joshua Just a side note, they could even be short-circuited (their R=0), so you have three Rs in parallel with total R/3, and then again (in series to them) three R in parallel, total R/3. This leads to sum 2/3 R of total resistance.
Jun
23
awarded  Enthusiast
Jun
11
answered Why are wires in simple circuits approximated as equipotentials?
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
In this specific point P, yes. Mathematically, you should consider derivative, and the angle of the orange line is tangent from U/I = 2, which leads to dI/dU = 0.5 = 1/R. But I'm trying to explain other way: if you increase voltage by dU, the current will increase by dI, and dI = dU / R. In typical (simplest) Ohm's law, the R is constant, so this is the same for all Us. In the graph presented it is non-linear function, so small (infinitely) changes should be considered.
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Why need you think it is voltage change? Think about current change because of voltage input. Take a look at your graph; U is in x-axis.
Jun
4
awarded  Teacher
Jun
4
answered Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
May
23
answered What happens when non-equal voltages are put in parallel?