315 reputation
17
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen yesterday

1d
awarded  Curious
1d
accepted In a Big Crunch, would there be more mass than at the Big Bang?
1d
asked In a Big Crunch, would there be more mass than at the Big Bang?
1d
revised Does expanding space cost energy?
corrected proportiona vs inversely proportional
1d
comment Does expanding space cost energy?
You probably wrote the answer before i made the edit, what i was getting at with "is space something" was really more "is space something that is created at the cost of energy", if that makes any sense at all (i was thinking similarly to how matter and energy are exchangeable, or maybe even the same thing, whatever that should mean)
2d
revised Does expanding space cost energy?
clarified second question
2d
comment Cooling down a container in outer space
i assume this should read 2.7K?
2d
comment Does expanding space cost energy?
@JohnRennie i think at the heart of my question is whether space itself (the metric, i guess) is "created" at the expense of energy. I guess the answers you pointed me to should make the answer "we don't know, but most explanations don't assume it"? I guess asking whether there are models in which space and energy are interchangeable or the same thing, as mass and energy, should be a seperate question.
2d
comment Does expanding space cost energy?
@JohnRennie looking at two different questions and their answers, i found one that i thought said the energy goes to the "dark energy", while another said it was going into the energy of the gravitational field. Is that related or am i mixing unrelated things here?
2d
asked Does expanding space cost energy?
Jul
23
comment Could one measure a stick to an arbitrary precision by having its length estimated by enough people?
Does the fact that people will probably only estimate the discrete mm steps change anything? Since that's not really normally distributed?! Assuming people do not just round the real length, which would break the question immediately.
Jul
21
accepted Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?
Jul
21
comment Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?
Ok, so you are saying: 1) photons are massless (are they?) and 2) photons are affected by gravity. But doesn't this make gravity non-symmetric in that a mass-ful particle interacts with a mass-less particle through gravity, but not the other way around? All other forces seem to be more symmetric (on the other hand, we havn't observed gravitational repulsion, have we ;-) )
Jul
21
asked Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?
Jun
18
comment Mathematically possible vs physically probable outcomes
@SeanD i took the real numbers because they represent a sequence of observations. I wanted to show that although the probability of never seeing an event during that sequence (say a 1-bit in the endless bit-sequence of that number) converges towards zero, it doesn't mean ending up with an infinite sequence of zeroes (aka the number 0) is impossible. And a random sequence could produce the same outcome every time, despite being random (think a fair coin that will always, by chance, show heads). You can't say "then it's not random to begin with". Samples always approximate a distribution.
Jun
18
comment Mathematically possible vs physically probable outcomes
Is this really true? I think that is what OP would like to get answered. Is it true that everything has nonzero probability, or are there constraints that completely rule out certain things?
Jun
18
comment Mathematically possible vs physically probable outcomes
Good answer, but i think the difference here is that in a random walk, the states are not independent. The next state depends on the state i just measured. In the experiment described by OP, one can at least assume independence (like a coin toss experiment).
Jun
18
awarded  Editor
Jun
18
revised Mathematically possible vs physically probable outcomes
added 140 characters in body
Jun
18
comment Mathematically possible vs physically probable outcomes
@Cruncher look here: math.stackexchange.com/questions/155156/…