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Dec
30
answered Fundamental group of Calabi-Yau 3-fold in string theory
Dec
26
revised Supersymmetric generalisation of the bosonic $\sigma$ model in QM
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Dec
25
answered Supersymmetric generalisation of the bosonic $\sigma$ model in QM
Dec
19
comment Braiding statistics of anyons from a Non-Abelian Chern-Simon theory
@Ideat cont. Witten's approach is more "thermodynamical" and he prefers to see the traces of the non-Abelian statistics in the partition function. To be more precise,(and this fact was also written in not so much words in Witten's paper): A non-Abelian Wilson loop can be thought of as a particle moving on a group or a flag manifold stuck to the boundary in the limit where its mass vanishes. Then its dynamics restricts upon quantization to the lowest Landau level producing the correct Wilson loop insertion.
Dec
19
comment Braiding statistics of anyons from a Non-Abelian Chern-Simon theory
@Idear These two approaches are very similar (but not exactly equivalent). Actually, Witten in his Jones polynomial paper (on page 365) refers to this similarity and asserts that the Wilson loop can be "thought of" as the trajectory of a particle in 2+1 dimensions. Witten refers to a famous paper by Polyakov adopting the strategy that Lee and Oh used later. This is only one of the numerous issues that Witten only talked about in his Jones polynomial paper (even without giving a single formula), which proved to be very fruitful for subsequent research.
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
answered Transferring CFT correlations from $\mathbb{R}^3$ to $S^3$
Dec
17
comment Collection of histories vs. collection of momentary configurations
@Nick Kidman 1) Yes, it is a quotient space often denoted as $ \mathcal{M}//G$ (with two lines) called the Marsden-Weinstein quotient or the symplectic quotient. $ \mathcal{M}$ is the unreduced phase space and $G$ is the gauge group.In a finite number of dimensions (where we can count), the dimension of the reduced space is $ \mathrm{dim] \mathcal{M} - 2\mathrm{dim] G$. The factor 2 comes from the fact that we need to remove one dimension per symmetry and another dimension for gauge fixing. 2) We can reduce only by the anomaly free subgroup of the gauge group.
Dec
16
answered Collection of histories vs. collection of momentary configurations
Dec
15
revised Braiding statistics of anyons from a Non-Abelian Chern-Simon theory
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Dec
15
answered Braiding statistics of anyons from a Non-Abelian Chern-Simon theory
Dec
15
comment Separability axiom really necessary?
@moppio89 cont. In quantum mechanics we are interested in computing probabilities. The Hilbert space is an auxiliary tool. The example that I had in mind is the case of bosonization where observable of the same physical system have representations on the Bose and Fermi Hilbert spaces.
Dec
15
comment Separability axiom really necessary?
@moppio89 Yes, I think that their main assumption that what is physically important can be deduced from a scattering process. In addition, the usual notion of vacuum restricts to a subspace of a nonseparable space. Also, may be the mathematical complications constituted a factor due to the need for more advanced measure theoretic analysis on the underlying space than in the case of a countable set.
Dec
12
answered Separability axiom really necessary?
Dec
10
comment Vector potential $A$ on a 2-sphere $S^2$ of radius $R$ with some points removed
@Hamurabi There is an error in the above analysis, the computation on the sphere is not correct. I'll post a correct answer very soon. I'll also answer your question in the comment, Sorry.
Dec
9
answered Vector potential $A$ on a 2-sphere $S^2$ of radius $R$ with some points removed
Dec
9
comment Magnetic Dipole: How to plug into Maxwell's equations?
You reached the (magnetic) continuity equation (the $4 \pi$ factor should not be there). The two solutions considered above automatically satisfy the (electric and magnetic) continuity equations. In the electric loop case, the sources satisfy $\mathbf{\nabla}.\mathbf{J}_e = 0$ and $\rho_e = 0$. In the magnetic charge case $\frac{\partial \rho_m}{\partial t} = 0$. (The charges are time independent) and $\mathbf{J}_m = 0$. I don't see an easy way to generate a magnetic dipole from a magnetic current.
Dec
9
comment Magnetic Dipole: How to plug into Maxwell's equations?
A magnetic current loop will give rise to an electric dipole and not a magnetic dipole solution, the same way that an electric current generates a magnetic dipole in the example above. These are the only solutions known to me to generate a magnetic dipole: 1) An electric current loop, 2)Two opposite magnetic charges.
Dec
9
comment Magnetic Dipole: How to plug into Maxwell's equations?
If magnetic charges would exist in Maxwell equations: $\mathbf{\nabla}.\mathbf{B} = 4 \pi \rho_m$ where $\rho_m$ is the magnetic charge density, then the magnetic dipole solution can be obtained exactly in the same way an electric dipole is obtained in the standard Maxwell theory; i.e., by taking two opposite infinitesimally spaced magnetic charges.
Dec
9
revised Magnetic Dipole: How to plug into Maxwell's equations?
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