Reputation
1,931
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
2 17 28
Impact
~80k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 35 votes cast
Nov
15
comment Do electrons actually reside in orbitals?
@sparkler Ok, the photo is very interesting. I will add an additional comment to this answer.
Nov
14
comment Do electrons actually reside in orbitals?
@Sparkler: let's go back to the vector space example. One one case, you have an xy plane, in the other case, you have rotated your axes 45 degrees so that the new x axis is pointing in the middle of the old xy plane. Given a point on that plane, its coordinates with the new and old system will be different, but the point is still in the same position.
Nov
14
comment Do electrons actually reside in orbitals?
@Sparkler those probabilities are obtained by the all-electron wavefunction, which in turn is derived from the one electron basis set. However, you can obtain that probability from different combinations. That's why you can see the same problem with valence orbitals (covalent + ionic) or with molecular orbitals (sigma + sigma^*), and it would not change a bit. They are just different functions that combine correctly into the same probability (and thus the same overall charge distribution)
Nov
14
comment Do electrons actually reside in orbitals?
@Sparkler I answered more specifically to your direct questions. Now it's dinner time.
Nov
14
comment Do electrons actually reside in orbitals?
@ToddR No I don't think so. I think that Sparkler is missing a vital vision of the topic that is due to an improper model during his training.
Jul
4
comment What is the optimal diameter for the exhaust hole in a pressurized vessel to deliver highest acceleration ?
@dmckee: maximum delta v
Oct
6
comment A telescope with a bunch of small mirrors
Also, the larger is the parabolic structure (so the larger is the telescope), the less the deviation would be important, so for the limit of a very, very large telescope, a flat one would be a reasonable approximation. Right ?
Oct
6
comment A telescope with a bunch of small mirrors
ok, but if the mirrors are flat, what effect would this deviation have ? less resolution, coma effects, chromatism, or would the telescope would just plain not work (optically, it would not make a focused, observable image)
Jun
17
comment What if our Sun were located in the middle of a globular cluster?
The view? damn epic: on one side the rest of the cluster, on the other side, the full Milky Way. I'd give my life to see it once with my eyes.
Jun
17
comment Telescopes to avoid as a beginner?
If you can't keep a steady hand with the binocular it means that the multiplication factor is too high. You can find mounts, but as a beginner you don't need high magnification. You need instead to learn your way around the sky, and be able to spot features (like nebulas or prominent galaxies) that are hard to see with the naked eye, but are invaluable for a more advanced initial exploration. @jonathan
Jun
11
comment Are the Voyager probes still sending us a signal ?
it's incredible to see how an object launched tens of years ago just traversed a bit more than half of one lightday of space. Gives an idea of the chances of getting anywhere close to traversing lightyears...
Jun
5
comment Is the length of the day increasing?
the title does not really match the content. I was expecting a different discussion.
Jun
2
comment A method to estimate the relative magnitude of a star using nearby stars
it was a historical, rather approximate method. Of course there are better methods today, but I fail to remember the name, and I was curious if someone remember it.
Jun
1
comment What is exactly a Dobsonian, and what are the differences when compared with Schmidt-Cassegrain or Newtonian?
did you build it yourself ?
May
31
comment Would a car tow rope withhold an adult person?
Remember a very important point. Climbing ropes are made so that they stretch and elastically absorb the stretch. This is, of course, because if you fall, a rigid rope would bring you to a sudden stop and likely break your body from the snap. Tow ropes are rigid, so your question may hold an intrinsic danger which I consider important to point out.
Feb
19
comment Decompressing gas whilst driving a turbine - where does the energy come from?
actually, to make the thing even more efficient, they could open a refrigerated storage facility in the same building.
Feb
3
comment Why is quicksilver (mercury) liquid at room temperature?
@Georg: I thought it was the layperson name. I always call it mercury, but I assumed non-scientific people may search for quicksilver on google.
Jan
25
comment How does the Kinect device work?
@Georg : it appears so
Jan
12
comment How to describe a well defined “zero moment” in time
Yes, but UTC does not define a unique, unambiguous and exactly traceable "zero" in its scale.
Jan
11
comment How to describe a well defined “zero moment” in time
@David: I don't think there are tons of methods. I think that, apart from those I gave, there may be another one or two I am not aware of.