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Mar
14
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
2
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
16
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
7
awarded  Good Question
Oct
27
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
6
comment Why is $F=-\nabla V$?
I thought that quote came from Zee
Jul
6
comment Why is $F=-\nabla V$?
Gotta laugh and cry at this: "a vector anything which transforms like a vector does under coordinate transformations." I prefer the definition as a quantity with a direction and magnitude that can be calculated from a set of numbers called its components. And the components transforming under rotations such that its direction and magnitude remains invariant.
May
9
accepted Is there a subtlety to the Lorentz transformations one needs to be aware of?
May
6
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
7
awarded  Altruist
Apr
6
comment Tensor Operators
A little OT: do you think it's worth learning about tensors from Tullio Levi-Civita's classic book? What book would you recommend for beginners?
Apr
4
answered Can we rigorously define force?
Apr
1
awarded  Investor
Mar
31
comment Quantum anharmonic ocscillator $E_0(\lambda)$ curve or table
Thanks to Vladimir and you for this interesting contribution! I'm surprised you didn't import the question to PO with your usual comment: "There's an answer here on PO" ;)
Mar
24
comment Can the Lorentz force expression be derived from Maxwell's equations?
@WetSavannaAnimalakaRodVance I'm just judging Ben as harshly as he judged Steve B's answer( which I believe is clearly correct). The -1 remains although my original reason is not correct: $F_{total} = d\vec p/dt$ is where Ben implicity defines the electric part of the Lorentz force at $v=0$.
Mar
16
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
23
comment Magnetic force between two charged particles?
The magnetic force isn't mutually the same generally.
Feb
23
comment Magnetic force between two charged particles?
The Biot Savart law is for a closed circuit current, and extending this to an isolated moving charge isn't trivial.