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To whom it may concern:

Please, leave a certain user alone that used to regularly post on Physics Stack Exchange. Stop whining and crying about it, and act your chronological rather than your social age. The site is doing just fine without him, and new stars will always appear to replace the old ones. The site is meant for users of all levels from highschool to research level, so it's not being downgraded at all--unless you want it to be a physics equivalent of Math Over Flow.

If you find the place too painful and unhealthy then just leave. No one particularly cares about you, anymore than they do about me or anyone else. It's just a place where people can ask and answer physics questions.

OK? Good. May your time be filled with lashings of physics, topped with more physics delights. Have a nice day :)


Jul
7
comment Twin Paradox: Still a Paradox?
-1: "Acceleration is said to be actually responsible for the difference in time-flow between the two twins"
Jul
3
answered How quickly should a fluid come to hydrostatic equilibrium?
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
26
accepted What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
Jun
26
comment What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
On the first line, you state the invariant process is the speed of light, which connects light like intervals.
Jun
26
comment What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
Yeah, I'm inclined to agree with this view. But this relates the invariance of light-like intervals only, right?
Jun
26
comment What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
@Muphrid Hmm, forget the "infinitesimally rotate" bit in the last comment. It should read "infinitesimally transform, keeping the count invariant".
Jun
26
comment What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
@Muphrid yes, they're rotated wrt one another. You derive the metric by laying out the space interval along the x-axis of one coordinate system, and then infinitesimally rotate the other coordinate systems consecutively. Integrating this gets you the metric in terms of the lengths measured along the orthogonal axis in the last coordinate system.
Jun
26
asked What invariant counting process derives the Minkowski metric?
Jun
24
revised What makes Poynting's theorem consistent for a charge moving in a static electric field?
tagged to show up in list for related questoins for Poynting vector
Jun
24
suggested suggested edit on What makes Poynting's theorem consistent for a charge moving in a static electric field?
Jun
20
answered Informal book on Classical Mechanics
Jun
3
accepted What type of mathematical structure is a physicist's definition of a vector space?
Jun
3
comment What type of mathematical structure is a physicist's definition of a vector space?
@garyp the transformation of an inner product space under rotations and translations, leaving the inner product invariant.
Jun
3
comment What type of mathematical structure is a physicist's definition of a vector space?
@garyp it's in the title.
Jun
3
asked What type of mathematical structure is a physicist's definition of a vector space?
May
30
comment Can one assign an equivalence principle of some kind to the EM field?
I'm under the impression that geodesics depend only on the end positions, and not the velocity since this is just a rotation in space-time and won't affect a geodesic.
May
5
comment Do you feel more impact force when falling straight down or tipping over?
So a ladder with its mass evenly distributed falls faster than one with the mass concentrated at any end: I'm surprised at this.
May
5
comment Do you feel more impact force when falling straight down or tipping over?
I think you've double counted the kinetic energy of the person when the ladder tips over.