7,230 reputation
1130
bio website embedinc.com/olin
location Littleton, Massachusetts
age 58
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen yesterday

Electrical engineering consultant specializing in microcontrollers and the circuitry around them. Master of engineering in EE from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1980.

We are certified Microchip design partners, and have been in the top catagory consistantly since around 2000. Various free downloads related to developing PIC firmware and other things are available at http://www.embedinc.com/pic/dload.htm.


Nov
19
comment Car driving / falling off of a cliff - will it land upright?
I don't think it really matters much where the center of gravity is relative to the two axles. No matter where it is, you get the same net torqe impulse from the back wheels being pushed up while the front wheels have already gone over the edge. This is where the rotation comes from. Center of mass relative to shape will eventually dictate what happens due to air resistance, but I'd say that is minimal in a 1/2 to 1 revolution fall for a typical car or van.
Nov
19
comment Car driving / falling off of a cliff - will it land upright?
The speed effects the net torque impulse imparted during the time the front wheels are over the edge but the back wheels not yet. This effects the rotation speed, which in turn effects the fall distance for one complete revolution.
Nov
19
answered Car driving / falling off of a cliff - will it land upright?
Oct
31
answered The sound of rotating helicopter blades
Oct
30
comment Can you pre-determine the result of a coin toss?
You left out air resistance, which I suspect has some impact on the outcome.
Oct
30
comment RL vs RC circuits
@Alf: No, it's not. This is a science site, not a kaffe klatsch. We expect people to properly state their assumptions. Rewarding a question this sloppy is doing the site a disservice.
Oct
29
comment RL vs RC circuits
You are making a bunch of assumptions that you did not state, including how exactly the R-L or R-C are connected, and what voltage or current is applied where and when. Without that t=0 is completely meaninless. -1 for the sloppiness. We do science here, not handwaving.
Oct
29
comment Silicon/silicon dioxide interface
You seem to be confusing a semiconductor junction with bulk semiconductor material. Photocells work like what you describe, but only when the photon hits in a semiconductor junction. The principle doesn't work in bulk semiconductor material, whether doped or not.
Oct
29
comment Bungee jumping - find spring constant
@Floris: I don't know, as that would require actually reading your answer. I saw a bunch of equations and "harmonic oscillator" mentioned in your first sentence, so thought I'd give a simpler answer.
Oct
29
answered Bungee jumping - find spring constant
Oct
28
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
27
answered Why would the lack of air in a mine in an asteroid prevent you from flooding it?
Oct
26
answered Is there a limit to the frame rate achievable with a high-speed camera?
Oct
26
revised Greatest and Least Resistance and Current Characteristics of Parallel vs Series circuits
added 152 characters in body
Oct
26
answered Greatest and Least Resistance and Current Characteristics of Parallel vs Series circuits
Oct
26
comment Greatest and Least Resistance and Current Characteristics of Parallel vs Series circuits
*"parallel has the greater resistance than current as parallel wiring if thought as water pump tubes has greater resistance during water flow". Huh? This gibberish makes no sense. We speak English here.
Oct
18
comment Spherical mirror ray diagram question
@TuP: What you are talking about is a approximation, useful only for spherical mirrors over small angles. A small piece of a sphere approximates a parabaloid well enough for some purposes, like a shaving mirror for example. For such small patches of a sphere, rays parallel to the axis get reflected so that they pass close to r/2. The bigger the angle of the spherical section, the more the error. To eliminate this error, the shape has to be parabaloid.
Oct
18
answered Why the emf of a battery doesn't depend on distance between the two electrodes?
Oct
18
comment Spherical mirror ray diagram question
@TuP: Then you were taught badly. Or more likely, you misunderstood something.