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Jan
13
reviewed Reject What does coordinate invariance mean?
Jan
9
comment How is complex permittivity measured?
Rolled back edit after incorrect and unnecessary addition.
Jan
9
awarded  Cleanup
Jan
9
revised How is complex permittivity measured?
rolled back to a previous revision
Jan
9
reviewed Approve How is complex permittivity measured?
Jan
6
reviewed Approve Optimum magnet layout for tripping a coil sensor
Jan
5
reviewed Reject How to calculate new air pressure with temperature change?
Jan
5
reviewed Reject How to calculate new air pressure with temperature change?
Jan
5
reviewed Reject How to calculate new air pressure with temperature change?
Jan
5
reviewed Reject How to calculate new air pressure with temperature change?
Jan
5
reviewed Approve How mass is determined in dynamics?
Jan
5
reviewed Approve magnetostatics and time varying fields
Jan
5
reviewed Approve Tidal Lock Radius in Habitable Zones
Dec
30
reviewed Approve Question about interacting fields and feynman diagrams
Dec
26
reviewed Approve A question on energy levels of molecular orbitals
Dec
24
comment What exactly does the Kretschmann scalar implies and how does it work?
When you test whether or not a singularity is removable, you're basically just testing whether or not scalars make any sense there. The easiest way to do this is probably with the volume element. Or, more simply, the metric determinant. If det(g) is zero or infinite then volumes don't make sense, so the singularity is not removable.
Dec
23
comment What exactly does the Kretschmann scalar implies and how does it work?
Wouldn't it be easier to determine if a metric has a removable singularity by whether or not the volume element $\sqrt{det(g_{\mu \nu})} d^4 x$ makes sense? If it blows up or becomes zero at the singularity in question then it is not removable.
Dec
23
comment Black hole and relativity
They would appear to asymptotically slow down as they approached the event horizon, and the light coming from them would be asymptotically red-shifted until they were no longer visible. Note that this isn't what 'actually' happens to the person who's falling, as they would experience nothing unusual when they approached and passed the event horizon (besides some potentially very strong tidal forces if the BH is small enough). This is just what would appear to happen due to the BH's effect on light.
Nov
12
reviewed Approve Computing covariance matrix of two mode state?
Oct
28
reviewed Approve Confusion about gravity