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Feb
27
comment Is angular momentum always conserved in the absence of an external torque?
It should also be pointed out that angular momentum is only conserved when the system's Lagrangian is invariant under rotations.
Feb
24
answered How does upwards acceleration affect tension on whirling mass?
Feb
24
answered Similarity between the Coulomb force and Newton's gravitational force
Feb
24
answered Light coming from a object travelling at speed of light?
Feb
24
comment Is 'restoring force' a particular type of force?
That's right. The tension on an elastic cord is a restoring force. Similarly, the restoring force for a spring is given by Hooke's law, whether it is stretched or compressed, because it always acts to bring the system back into equilibrium.
Feb
24
answered Is 'restoring force' a particular type of force?
Feb
24
answered Representing forces as one-forms
Feb
23
comment Does the mass of a falling body decrease?
You might find my post here to be helpful: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/54701/…
Feb
23
comment Problem in average height
I don't know how to answer without more details from the problem. He might be treating the water as a single object. Then the work done in lifting it out of the container will be equal to the work done in lifting a single particle with mass equal to the water, concentrated at the water's center of mass. The water's center of mass is initially at $y=15$ m.
Feb
22
answered Find work done by force along a path - is parameterization the only way?
Feb
22
answered Are gravitomagnetic monopoles hypothesized?
Feb
22
comment Electric field caused by magnetic field
$\nabla$ is the gradient operator, not to be confused with $\Delta$.
Feb
22
comment Electric field caused by magnetic field
The electric field produced by a changing magnetic field is non-conservative. A conservative field is a field which can be written as the gradient of a potential function. In the case of the electric field produced by static charges, it can be written as $\mathbf{E}=-\nabla\phi$ where $\phi$ is the electric potential. When changing magnetic fields are introduced, it becomes $\mathbf{E}=-\nabla\phi-\partial \mathbf{A}/\partial t$ where $\mathbf{A}$ is the magnetic vector potential. Thus, it is no longer conservative.
Feb
22
answered Is light affected by gravity? Why?
Feb
22
comment Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?
I wouldn't say it's "wrong." I'd say it's an approximation, and a very good one at that.
Feb
22
comment Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?
Within the context of Newtonian gravity, yes, all you need to worry about is mass. Your textbook is correct.
Feb
22
answered Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?
Feb
22
comment Null geodesic given metric
I mean the second-order differential equation, which is called the "geodesic equation."
Feb
21
comment I don't understand the relationship between electron indistinguishability and the Pauli exclusion principle
I'm not sure why I was down-voted. This is pretty much straight out of Griffiths'.
Feb
21
answered I don't understand the relationship between electron indistinguishability and the Pauli exclusion principle