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2d
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2d
revised Viscosity and surface tension
added 54 characters in body
2d
answered Viscosity and surface tension
Nov
9
comment Is it a misconception?
The situation in 3. is commonly referred to as neutrally buoyant
Nov
6
comment Adding a tracer to the surface of a water droplet
If I'm understanding it correctly, you wish to go for a tracer particle technique instead of the mirror technique that @Floris suggested in answer to your previous question. Could you explain your rational? It seems to me that you want your measurement technique to be as non-intrusive as possible, while adding particles certainly doesn't classify as non-intrusive. Moreover, adding particles is probably not even easier to do. Bottom line: I don't see benefits of this method over the mirrors, could you elaborate on your view?
Nov
6
comment Resources for droplets investigation
@Hossein If you use a search engine like web of science or scopus you can first do the search and then use refine on article type, where you can select review as the preferred type
Nov
5
answered Resources for droplets investigation
Nov
2
answered What is the maximum height for a puddle of water, assuming stp?
Oct
31
comment Get angle to hit (x,y) with vertex
Could you make a drawing of what your looking for to clarify the question?! The way I read it now you want the point of contact with the ground to be the vertex of the parabola, which is generally not possible
Oct
30
comment How to prevent water droplets becoming larger on the tip of a nozzle?
Terrific answer! Just one small remark, in $F = \pi d \gamma$ I would include a $\cos \theta$ term to account for the wettability of the nozzle. I know this is only an order of magnitude estimate anyway, but I think it helps to have the effect of the hydrophobic nozzle in there explicitly
Oct
23
revised finding equation of a water droplet
added 148 characters in body
Oct
22
answered finding equation of a water droplet
Oct
22
comment finding equation of a water droplet
@Hossein ok, so you are basically looking at droplets that are still wobbling due to their release then?! In that case my suggestion doesn't work indeed.
Oct
22
comment finding equation of a water droplet
@Hossein As I mentioned: droplets tend to flatten at the bottom so you expect $H/W<1$ where $H$ is the height of the droplet in the direction of gravity and $W$ the width perpendicular to that direction.
Oct
22
comment finding equation of a water droplet
@MikeDunlavey if they are sufficiently small they are, but if they have a typical size around the capillary length they tend to become somewhat flattened at the bottom. That said, the ellipsoid in the image looks way too non-spherical (but it might be the particular view).
Oct
20
comment Underdetermined forces in a statics problem
BenCrowell, Isn't the answer just the same as in the example of @BMS ? Even without friction the cylinder will remain static, like the block on a string. Friction is a `response force' i.e. its magnitude is equal to the force applied to it (up to some maximum), so in your case giving the surface a friction coefficient doesn't result in a friction force, because the system was already balanced
Oct
11
comment Would you die before reaching the ground?
@Floris - I guess you have this in mind ;) hugelolcdn.com/i700/188681.jpg
Oct
10
revised Why do Oreo crumbs float to a single glob at the very center in a glass of milk?
added ST tag
Oct
10
suggested suggested edit on Why do Oreo crumbs float to a single glob at the very center in a glass of milk?
Oct
10
comment Why do Oreo crumbs float to a single glob at the very center in a glass of milk?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/71292 (possible duplicate from an underlying physics perspective)