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Jan
27
comment Do we know why there is a speed limit in our universe?
@njzk2 "If I measure the time it takes for light to go to the moon and back, I can measure that the distance / time is c." By who's reckoning of "distance" and "time"? The problem is that your world view is dictated by a bunch of "invariants" that really aren't "invariant" at all. Which is again what Kostya is talking about.
Jan
22
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
answered How can we see planets thousands of light years away but don't know if there are more planets in the solar system?
Jan
19
comment How am I able to stand up and walk down the aisle of a flying passenger jet?
"as long as relativistic effects can be ignored" is misleading. Relativistic effects would not change this fact at all. That was the entire basis for SR. It seems you have forgotten the time dilation/length contraction terms in the Lorentz boost.
Jan
11
comment Does quantum mechanics play a role in the brain?
@alanf I agree with what you say. But that wasn't the question. You are saying that a macroscopic model of the brain is unlikely to require taking into account quantum effects. I contend that that does not answer the question, (are quantum effects important in the understanding of the brain).
Jan
11
comment Does quantum mechanics play a role in the brain?
Further, there are QM processes that occur in time ranges outside of nano/fempto second. For example glow sticks decay slowly due to the forbidden transitions which can only be explained by QM.
Jan
11
comment Does quantum mechanics play a role in the brain?
This answer does not answer the question. The question was on whether QM processes are involved in the brain, not, whether the brain is a Classical computer or not. Modern computers are underpinned by semi conductor physics, which is QM, but they are classical computers, which could be built using purely classical valves. Given that smell is increasingly thought to be a QM process AND photosynthesis IS a QM process, I suspect that the brain could have QM processes as well.
Dec
8
comment Can we create and destroy energy simultaneously at different points in a space?
@Luaan I get that virtual particles are somewhat misleading, since they can never be observed directly. But it still seems strange that Feynman diagrams with unphysical numbers are allowed to perturbate the integral.
Dec
8
comment Can we create and destroy energy simultaneously at different points in a space?
Pretty sure that this is wrong or I've completely misunderstood the concept of Virtual Particles.
Sep
22
comment Why is the Sun almost perfectly spherical?
Another point. The sun is really hot. That means most of it behaves like a fluid, meaning it doesn't take long for forces to deform it.
Sep
17
comment Could the black hole in the center of the galaxy be a white hole?
"singularity is, by definition, hidden" flies in the face of work done by Kip Thorne, who famously won a bet to that effect against a Stephen Hawking.
Sep
17
comment Do antiparticles exhibit different chemical properties?
@Gert my point is that only CPT is preserved. We know certain reactions break CP/CT symmetry, so it is completely possible for chemical reactions to be slightly different (they would of course be similar to a few 9s).
Sep
17
comment Do antiparticles exhibit different chemical properties?
Three words for you, Charge Parity and Time.
Sep
14
comment How can fast moving particles gain energy from slow moving ones?
Important caveat. Assuming Isothermal Compression. We can do some interesting things with a CD nozzle with steam (like in a LOX Liquid Hydrogen rocket).
Sep
14
comment How can fast moving particles gain energy from slow moving ones?
-1 Although this is a nice answer, it does not ANSWER the core question of the absolute limit act which you can accelerate a fluid using a Convergent Nozzle.
Aug
30
comment Why does spinning a golf ball one way make it go further than spinning it the other way?
Here is a YouTube video showing the effect in action youtube.com/watch?v=QtP_bh2lMXc
Aug
30
comment Why does spinning a golf ball one way make it go further than spinning it the other way?
The magnus effect. In very simple terms, the spinning ball drags the air to spin around it. A back spinning ball will therefore push the air behind it downwards. Newton's 3rd says, therefore that pushes the ball upwards.
Aug
17
comment How does water help extinguish fire?
@RBarryYoung don't forget low-toxicity.
Aug
14
comment Save a falling person by nullifying their mass or reversing gravity
Anything you could do that could save the man would have to be gradual...
Aug
14
comment Save a falling person by nullifying their mass or reversing gravity
Okay so insane gravitational field... Thus insane gravitational gradient, there extreme tidal effects. Therefore pancakes.