1,355 reputation
316
bio website reedbeta.com
location Milpitas, CA
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 18 hours ago

I'm a graphics programmer, an amateur physicist, and a sci-fi nerd. I teach computers how to make pretty pictures. I'm excited by beautiful, immersive, story-driven games and interactive fiction. I enjoy messing around with esoteric ideas. I like explaining things.

I currently work for NVIDIA DevTech. Previously, I worked for Sucker Punch Productions on the Infamous series of games for PS3 and PS4.

reedbeta.com - developer blog, OpenGL demos, and other projects. @reedbeta on Twitter.


9h
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
24
comment Does gravity play a role in the Earth's equatorial bulge?
Just guessing, but a balloon full of a very viscous liquid, like honey, might be a better model than a ball of dirt. It has a solid skin surrounding a liquid interior. The Earth's mantle isn't exactly a liquid, but it sort of behaves that way. On the other hand, the Earth's crust isn't stretchy like a rubber balloon. My guess is if gravity were turned off, the Earth's crust and mantle would fracture and fly apart under its centrifugal force, leaving only the solid core.
Jun
23
answered All of Physics!
Jun
23
answered Heisenberg uncertainty principle clarification
Jun
17
answered Tap water in the cold glass
Jun
11
accepted Microscopic source of pressure in an incompressible fluid
Jun
1
comment Minimal set of invariants to specify a Kepler orbit
@CuriousOne The energy definitely varies from one orbit to another (keeping the orbiting object's mass fixed), so I don't think it's true that it doesn't do you any good. To factor out the masses of different objects, you could use "energy per unit mass" instead.
Jun
1
asked Minimal set of invariants to specify a Kepler orbit
May
18
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
14
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
comment Is anti-matter matter going backwards in time?
I read somewhere that the "one electron going back and forth in time" idea was Wheeler's, not Feynman's originally. (Wheeler was Fenyman's thesis advisor.) Unfortunately I forgot where I heard this, but it was probably in one of Feyman's lectures/writings.
Jan
20
comment Can an electric field align water molecules?
Microwave ovens work because water molecules (and other polar molecules) try to align with the rapidly oscillating microwave field...so I guess it doesn't take that much field strength.
Jan
20
comment Physics of guitar strings
And to the OP, the phenomenon is called guitar harmonics and Wikipedia has a good explanation.
Jan
20
comment Physics of guitar strings
@fqq "one octave higher in pitch than when I press down firmly at the same place", i.e. the 3rd harmonic of the open string, compared to fretting the string to 2/3 of its open length.
Jan
16
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
revised Is space stretched with no limits by a black hole?
correction: the tape-measure-dropping distance isn't infinite
Jan
8
comment Is space stretched with no limits by a black hole?
@JohnRennie Ahh, too bad! I should've checked it more closely myself. :)
Jan
8
comment Duality in Electromagnetic Spectrum
@Beauness No, all the spectrum has discrete quanta, but the energy per photon is smaller at lower frequency ($E = h\nu$). So for radio waves the discreteness is harder to detect than for light. Nevertheless, radio waves come in quanta as well.
Jan
7
answered Is space stretched with no limits by a black hole?