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seen Mar 10 '13 at 10:26

Jan
20
asked Non-destructive measurement of qbits
Jan
17
comment Aren't all physical relations non-linear?
I may have misunderstood, but you seem to claim that a (currently most popular) theory is not to be doubted "at all". But Newtonian mechanics was a very well accepted theory. If one had excluded apriori any possiblity of doubts, then there would today not be the theory of Einstein, right? As to your term "deform", imagine that we were back into the time of Newton, wouldn't you similarly claim that his theory is robust and can't be deformed?
Jan
16
comment Aren't all physical relations non-linear?
"garanteed by theory" in physics is virtually the same as accepting axioms in math IMHO. Now who garantees that a given theory is in fact true (in the genuine sense)? History tells that lots of theories got replaced later by better ones as science progresses and experimental means become more sophisticated. BTW I am not well informed but I remember to have read that there was a project not long ago to test the theory of relativity. If one simply accepts the theory, there would of course be no need of a test. After all, a theory is a "theory", not exactly the same as "truth", isn't it?
Jan
16
awarded  Student
Jan
16
comment Aren't all physical relations non-linear?
I suppose there is a logical problem with your argumentation. You accepted that pV = nRT isn't exact, but why should then (apriori) other linear relations be completely exact? Experimental measurements could confirm a postulated relation but only to a certain confidence level corresponding to the accuracies achievable with the best apparatus that are currently available, isn't it?
Jan
16
asked Aren't all physical relations non-linear?