190 reputation
17
bio website
location
age 22
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Apr 15 at 13:04

Dec
10
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
21
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
22
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
awarded  Teacher
Jul
21
comment Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
Hypothetically, if a theory predicted that in the "fake universe", the two bodies wouldn't feel a different pull if they moved away from each other, that would just mean that the Newton/Einstein theories are approximations of the general laws. That they give most precise results in our part of the universe, with our circumstances.
Jul
21
comment Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
I just updated my question. Let me know how I can make it more clear.
Jul
21
revised Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
More explanation.
Jul
21
comment Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
That's one definition. But is that the consensus? Are there other theories that describe gravity in other ways? Perhaps the second way that I described?
Jul
21
awarded  Editor
Jul
21
revised Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
edited body
Jul
21
asked Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?
May
1
awarded  Supporter
Apr
30
comment Is dark matter repulsive to dark matter? Why?
Thank you for your clear answer :) So assuming something like our sun is dense enough to pull dark matter towards itself, dark matter would get attracted, but it would pass through the sun because it can't collide with it. What about black holes? Aren't they dense enough to hold dark matter in? And also, if dark matter doesn't radiate as it is falling into a black hole, then large amounts of dark matter would fall into black holes, and that would make the black hole grow too fast, perhaps faster than what we have observed, right?
Apr
30
accepted Is dark matter repulsive to dark matter? Why?
Apr
30
comment Is dark matter repulsive to dark matter? Why?
Exactly. But we still need to know why dark matter doesn't form dense objects itself. It has attractive gravity, and there is no electromagnetism to push it's particles apart.
Apr
30
asked Is dark matter repulsive to dark matter? Why?
Apr
30
accepted How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay?
Apr
26
comment How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay?
I don't get the down vote either.
Apr
25
awarded  Scholar
Apr
25
awarded  Student