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seen Jan 26 '12 at 20:37

Mar
7
awarded  Supporter
Mar
3
comment Where should a physicist go to learn chemistry?
I'll second Linus Pauling's book. I don't know of any legal free downloads, but Dover sells it for pretty cheap.
Mar
3
answered Where does the energy from a nuclear bomb come from?
Mar
1
answered List of freely available physics books
Feb
26
answered When lasers are used to cool atoms or ions, etc where does the heat go?
Feb
22
comment Quantum shot-noise and the fluctuation dissipation theorem
For that specific case (damped oscillator vs. quantum electromagnetic field), the QM treatment of the simple harmonic oscillator is mathematically equivalent to the QM treatment of a single mode of the EM field. Can I show how? Maybe, but that's more work and typing than I care do do. Look at whatever section of your quantum optics book quantizes the field. I'd bet money they're using photon creation and annihilation operators with the same commutation relations as the raising and lowering operators of the harmonic oscillator.
Feb
22
answered Quantum shot-noise and the fluctuation dissipation theorem
Feb
18
comment Angular momentum
So what does the column matrix refer to? Is the problem about a spin-1/2 particle, and that's the spinor state expressed in the basis of S_z eigenstates? Or what? Being explicit about this is necessary for understanding/answering the question. Maybe you could write out your state in the L m_l S m_s basis? Then it might be more straightforward to answer your questions about j^2 by having a quick look at a Clebsch-Gordan table. I'm saying this not only to have enough information so others can help you more, but also to steer you in (possibly) the right direction for solving it yourself.
Feb
18
comment What is the world's biggest Schrodinger cat?
Define "larger". Number of particles? Physical size? More publicity? Greater scientific impact? One could argue endlessly about what would constitute the "largest" cat. Ferinstance, the superconducting junction paper Chad Orzel referenced has a large number of particles, but - if I remember correctly - the superposition still evolves phase like it was just 2 electrons (a single Cooper pair). As opposed to some ion-trap-quantum-computer cats, which may have only a dozen particles, but the superpostion evolves phase like a dozen-particle object.
Feb
18
comment Angular momentum
Looking at your state, I'm totally confused. What the deuce does the "T" superscript refer to, and why is that comma in there? Also, the "state" given tells us nothing about the spin state of the particle - and you haven't told us what kind of particle it is - so the majority of your questions are unanswerable.
Feb
16
comment Visibility of moon-based laser from Earth
There are ways to "be seen" from the moon that would require much less power: illuminate a smaller area on the earth with your laser, and wait until the location of your laser on the moon is dark.
Feb
16
answered How many stabilised qubits have been achieved in Quantum Computing?
Feb
16
answered Visibility of moon-based laser from Earth
Feb
16
answered Historically, how do we know that Earth moves around Sun? And it does so in an elliptical orbit?
Feb
14
awarded  Teacher
Feb
14
answered What is a good reference for the quantum mechanical description of lasers?