811 reputation
119
bio website none
location Italy
age 25
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Apr 6 at 22:23

I'm a student of physics, particularly theoretical, with a good interest for maths, quantum mechanics (computation, optics etc), relativity and complexity.


Mar
5
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Oct
20
comment Why is classical physics not valid for a harmonic oscillator in its lowest energy state?
A large difference is in the fact that the lowest value of energy in classical mechanics is zero, while in the quantum case is not. You should state better which passages you don't understand for us to be able to answer. I don't have the book.
Oct
20
answered Why is the wave function complex?
Oct
19
comment Wave functions for 2D potential with spin interactions
Any insight from perturbations theory?
Oct
14
revised What does it mean for a Hamiltonian to be SU(2) invariant?
added tags
Oct
14
suggested suggested edit on What does it mean for a Hamiltonian to be SU(2) invariant?
Oct
14
answered What does it mean for a Hamiltonian to be SU(2) invariant?
Oct
2
comment Quantum tunneling effect in a potential of the kind $V(x)=A\frac{x^2}{1+x^4}$
Sorry, I simply had misunderstood the shape of the potential, that's why I asked you "where".
Oct
2
comment How does a “hammer thrower” that we see in the Olympics, impart so much momentum
I wouldn't say "derived from the earth" but I guess you understood the idea. If you're satisfied, please accept the answer.
Oct
1
comment Quantum tunneling effect in a potential of the kind $V(x)=A\frac{x^2}{1+x^4}$
Yes, I had plotted it. My question is, it crosses the 'wall' and goes where?
Oct
1
answered How does a “hammer thrower” that we see in the Olympics, impart so much momentum
Oct
1
comment Quantum tunneling effect in a potential of the kind $V(x)=A\frac{x^2}{1+x^4}$
Can this be called tunnel effect? There is only one minimum, where does the particle tunnel to? It's just a question, perhaps I'm wrong...
Oct
1
comment Hamiltonian or not?
That's probably the best answer. It's very interesting. Actually, you were able to find a Lagrangian, though then the Euler's equations must still be coupled with (3).
Oct
1
accepted Hamiltonian or not?
Jun
2
revised Schrödinger equation for many body systems
title misspelled.
Jun
2
suggested suggested edit on Schrödinger equation for many body systems
May
23
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
21
comment Quantum mechanics and everyday nature
The problem is that the macroscopical effects of magnetism are perfectly explained by Maxwell's equations, in a classical framework. What needs quantum mechanics is its microscopical description, that is not a 'naked eye' thing. Of course your answer is OK, but in my opinion is not really convincing. We should find something that had no explanation before QM.