1,701 reputation
619
bio website eutactic.wordpress.com
location Australia
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen May 17 at 1:08

grad student, computational quantum chemistry

Interests include chemistry, high performance computing, graphics, art, typesetting, programming (python, Java, C#, XAML)


Dec
16
revised What is a single word that describes the idea of the second time derivative of energy?
removed ambiguity in title
Dec
16
suggested suggested edit on What is a single word that describes the idea of the second time derivative of energy?
Nov
14
revised On BE and FD Statistics
spelling, formatting, retag, elaborated FD, BE and GR
Nov
14
suggested suggested edit on On BE and FD Statistics
Nov
13
comment If a car appears in horison and within 2 seconds passes you by, whats the speed it's doing?
Additionally, one cannot assume that the car popped over the horizon in the video, as the point at which it appears could have simply been the point where its angular diameter fills a single pixel of the camera.
Nov
13
asked Do amorphous metals undergo conchoidal fracture?
Nov
9
comment What happens if you try to freeze water in an water tight container
+1, a quantitative answer!
Nov
5
comment How 'pure' is liquid nitrogen?
@Georg - That hardly reduces the value of a decent answer to a broadly applicable question.
Nov
1
comment Chance of “macro tunneling”?
An alternative interpretation would be to treat the entire grain as a single relatively massive particle with a tiny de Broglie wavelength
Nov
1
comment Chance of “macro tunneling”?
@SchroedingersGhost - I'm going to trust that Alexander's interpretation is good and say that the probability is arbitrary as T depends on unknown parameters. The important part is that the double exponent you need to raise T to to get the transmission probability of all of the particles will make any probability less than exactly 1 vanishingly small. If T were 1 in 10, T^10^23 would be 1 in 1 followed by 100 sextillion zeroes. That's a number so gobsmackingly large it gives me a headache to think about it.
Oct
27
comment Water and superconductors
@Rudy Gruse - See if you can find Basic Solid State Chemistry by A.R. West - it has a great introduction to superconductivity in ch. 7.3 including diagrams covering superconductors being levitated and suspended against gravity in magnetic fields. There's also a great photo of a lady sitting on a magnet floating a few cm above a superconductor, however her levitation relies upon the presence of both the strong magnet and the perfectly diamagnetic superconductor. Hope this is useful!
Oct
27
comment Water and superconductors
@Rudy Gruse - Water has a polar charge distribution, but this is different from having unpaired spin. Water is weakly diamagnetic, as such it can be repelled by enormously strong magnetic fields (cf. Geim's levitating frog). Superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic - no field can pass through (flux pinning notwithstanding) so they are strongly repelled by magnetic fields. As Jen points out, a superconducting supermagnet can produce the field necessary to elicit levitation in weak diamagnets of low mass. This is not an effect of superconductors, per se, but of magnetic fields.
Oct
26
comment Water and superconductors
@Rudy Gruse - What makes you think that a superconductor will repel water?
Oct
24
comment Is the cooling rate of a (very) cold object, sitting next to an AC higher or lower?
@ seldary - This question is confusing. Both cans will heat up to reach eventual thermal equilibrium with their environment, rather than cool.
Oct
17
comment Over what distances can one send/ receive from a GPS chip implant in a dog?
@ Vineet Menon - Whilst a GPS device can locate itself anywhere in the world, the device cannot necessarily be located by a third party unless it actually transmits its position by radio or over a communication network, which will necessarily have variable range and coverage. GPS devices only calculate their position via the GPS satellites, they don't transmit to them.
Oct
11
revised How to get distance when acceleration is not constant?
update
Oct
11
revised How to get distance when acceleration is not constant?
note about period of applicability of jerk
Oct
11
answered How to get distance when acceleration is not constant?
Oct
11
accepted The Born-Oppenheimer approximation and muonic molecules
Oct
11
revised How does one calculate the force applied on an object by a magnetic field?
energy -> force