3,625 reputation
1240
bio website migdal.wikidot.com
location Warsaw, Poland
age 29
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen Mar 22 at 19:34

Data science freelancer (data analysis and data visualization, Python and D3.js mostly), with PhD in quantum physics (from ICFO, Castelldefels near Barcelona).

Interested in complex networks, data-driven science and mathematical modeling in psychology. Dedicated to education of gifted schoolchildren (as both tutor and organizer) and some . In free time enjoys photography and hiking.


Dec
23
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
12
revised Optics - Faraday Rotator using waveplates
deleted 34 characters in body
Dec
10
comment Light Polarizer and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
See this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Dec
4
revised Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
added 46 characters in body
Dec
4
comment Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
The point is in absorption per propagation.
Dec
4
comment Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
Metals - I was thinking about them, but AFAIK they have high absorption, which also gives raise to high reflection (though, through a different mechanism). Or am I wrong?
Dec
4
awarded  Excavator
Dec
4
revised Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
added 113 characters in body
Dec
4
comment Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
@Ruslan Theoretic calculations based on interference of wave scattered from each atom layer. It results in both refraction and reflection from boundaries. For very strong coupling, and a certain phase of reflection, there is evanescence. Periodicity - you are right. By "uniform" I mean spatial period much, much smaller than (vacuum) wavelength.
Dec
4
revised Interpretation of Dirac equation states
added missing imaginary unit (oscillations, not - decay)
Dec
4
comment Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
@tom Because it misses evanescent depth (which, in my model, can be arbitrary). And for $n\to\infty$ you get 100% reflected, but no evanescent field at all.
Dec
4
comment Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
@Sushant23 Did you read the last line? I am not a high-school student, I am a PhD.
Dec
4
asked Total internal reflection for perpendicular incidence
Nov
9
awarded  Yearling
Oct
28
comment Why does the BB84 paper “Quantum cryptography: Public key distribution and coin tossing” have a 'withdrawn' status?
@PeterShor I saw a few times an article being republished (I have no idea about its practical or legal side; especially I don't track which small journal/conference is owned by another). For an example, see this reprint of the original Shannon paper: dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=584093.
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
3
awarded  Popular Question